user1873

Earth

BG.SE

Age: 40

The economy is in fact over-expanded, particularly in railroad construction, and the weak link turns out to be the banking house of Jay Cooke and Company, which helped the U.S. Government finance the Civil War and also underwrote the construction of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Jay Cooke and Company, a large and respected banking house declares itself bankrupt, and announces its failure on September 18, 1873.. (The bank's collapse precipitates the "Panic of 1873" and the ensuing three yea depression during which more than 10,000 businesses fail.     The basic economic problems are overproduction, a declining market and deflation. Investors in Europe, where a depression is already underway, begin to call in American loans. The New York Stock Exchange closes its doors for 10 days; other businesses fail; and railroad construction is curtailed, with some railroads defaulting on their bonds. The unemployed begin to move about the country seeking jobs, and bread lines appear in the cities. The hard times drove numbers of laboring people and those in humble circumstances to the West and other portions of the country, to seek the rewards which the stagnation of business in the great commercial centre denied them.

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awarded Famous Question
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awarded Nice Answer
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comment Can providing a basic income to a subset of poor citizens benefit the government politically: is this question suitable for Politics SE?
seems too broad, "Political benefits might include increased government popularity, increased political stability, decreased crime rates or decreased ethnic tension."
Jan
29
comment Can providing a basic income to a subset of poor citizens benefit the government politically?
Possible duplicate of Is there any evidence that giving cash to poor people is "better" than giving in-kind goods?
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awarded Popular Question
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awarded Good Answer
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awarded Famous Question
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awarded Popular Question
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awarded Notable Question
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20
awarded Yearling
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awarded Yearling
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awarded Nice Question
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awarded Popular Question
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awarded Nice Answer
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awarded Revival
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comment What's the best way to teach/learn the Game of Thrones board game for people who haven't played before?
@Thunderforge, feel free to do it yourself. I don want to take the time to create a good generic answer that could be used for all games, nor a FFG GoT specific answer. If you do, I will upvote you.
Nov
5
comment Forbidden Island - Extending to 5 players
Forbidden Island official variant maps
Nov
5
comment Forbidden Island - Extending to 5 players
It will make it probably slightly harder. You now have more players that will have to move to other players locations to get 4 of the 5 treasures of each color. The difficulty increase is probably insignificant compared to he difference in playing at Legenday versus Standard difficulty, or playing some of the more elaborate island configurations.
Nov
5
comment What's the best way to teach/learn the Game of Thrones board game for people who haven't played before?
As a rules explainer, I would suggest reading the rulebook the day before you are going to play. I would also play a fake game against yourself, playing as all players (not a complete game, but at least all the phases of the game). Finally, on the day you play, start with explaining the objective of the game. How you win, how you lose, when the game ends. Then A brief discussion of the phases of a turn, and what choices you can make during your turn (describing the bits and board and what things mean). play a couple of fake rounds so everyone understands the mechanics of the game.
Nov
5
comment What's the best way to teach/learn the Game of Thrones board game for people who haven't played before?
Fantasy Flighthas some gameplay videos to explain the rules. They explain each phase of the game.
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