Sep
18
awarded Custodian
Sep
18
reviewed Edit and Reopen Do biological facts determine when a human fetus is considered alive and human?
Sep
18
revised Do biological facts determine when a human fetus is considered alive and human?
Change question wording for answers that are not opinion-based
Sep
16
reviewed Close What is MHC haplotype?
Mar
12
awarded Supporter
Dec
14
awarded Yearling
Dec
14
awarded Yearling
Sep
19
awarded Nice Answer
Jul
19
reviewed Needs Improvement What is the best way to clean plastic flasks that have been used for cell cultures - is virkon a good idea?
Jul
19
reviewed Excellent Intracellular lipid transport
Jul
19
reviewed Needs Improvement By what mechanism is Streptococcus bovis acting as a risk factor for colorectal cancer?
Jul
19
reviewed Needs Improvement Is there a DNA test to identify dog mixes?
Jul
19
reviewed Satisfactory Why does oxygen bind to hemoglobin in an specific angle?
Jul
19
reviewed Satisfactory Immunity during pregnancy
Jul
19
reviewed Needs Improvement Prenatal Marketing
Jul
19
reviewed Needs Improvement Deep diving in mammals
Jul
2
awarded Notable Question
Apr
30
reviewed Close What are the long-term negative effects of going without water/food for a period of time
Mar
11
comment What was the first bit of mathematics that made you realize that math is beautiful? (For children's book)
@KevinF In my case, I'd say the two first "real math" books happened to be Linear Algebra by Shilov and Calculus by Spivak. Shilov, it turns out, was wildly inappropriate for such an introduction, but it impressed me nonetheless. Spivak (such wonderful writing) and Calculus I by Apostol (also wonderfully clear, but not so playful as Spivak) have great introductory chapters that build the basic properties of real numbers, but assume the reader (like me) isn't so familiar with proof-based math.
Mar
8
comment What was the first bit of mathematics that made you realize that math is beautiful? (For children's book)
In my childhood, there were lots of attempts to get me to like math by discussing patterns of numbers, etc. Those never really did it for me because I always felt there was some trickery I didn't fully understand. What really first inspired me was the first time I picked up a book that first stated the field axioms precisely. It then went on to prove all of the relationships of basic arithmetic that I had kept as disconnected "it-just-works-that-way" facts in my head for years. It was that beautiful reasoning that got me hooked.
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