Pieter Wuille

Belgium

bitcoin.sipa.be

Age: 30

2d
revised Why are transactions separate in a block?
deleted 1 character in body
2d
answered Why are transactions separate in a block?
2d
comment Would a normalized, hashed, protected chainstate reduce miner storage costs?
Blocks are sometimes found a few seconds apart, so just using the previous block may still affect relay performance significantly for such blocks. You could go back further in time, but that also has costs, as you somehow need to be able to relay old chainstates to new nodes, so they have to be accessible. There has been some work around merkleizing the chainstate itself, so that its root hash can be recomputed on the fly for each update, but this still adds very significant validation costs.
Jul
26
answered Would a normalized, hashed, protected chainstate reduce miner storage costs?
Jul
18
comment How long does it take on average to receive one confirmation? Is it still reversible?
@runeks Assuming the hashrate is constant and the difficulty exactly matches it, the expected time until the next block is always 10 minutes, regardless of how long you have waited so far.
Jul
17
revised Using the bitcoin wallet PKI for message encryption
deleted 2 characters in body
Jul
16
awarded Nice Answer
Jul
15
answered Why new public key for every new request?
Jul
14
comment Versions of protocols for BTC and TEST?
You're confusing transaction versions with block versions. The answer is correct.
Jul
14
comment Versions of protocols for BTC and TEST?
This is about block versions (which are at 3, since BIP66 took effect). The question was about transaction versions (which have been at 1 since Bitcoin's creation).
Jul
13
comment Is there a difference between "In" and "Out" peer connections?
There is a small difference: Bitcoin Core tries to avoid synchronizing from incoming peers, in order to retain the "if you don't listen, you won't have huge transfer volumes" invariant.
Jul
11
comment The shortest ECDSA signature
There exists no valid signature with r=1, as there is no point on the secp256k1 curve with x=1. You could look for r=4 though!
Jul
9
answered Does bitcoind accept batch RPC calls?
Jul
5
comment Possible to speed up reindex?
Put more simply: reindez does exactly the same as redownloading the chain from scratch, except it reuses the blocks on disk you already have.
Jul
3
comment Ubuntu. (blockchain of version 0.9.3 compatible with 0.10.1?)
Forward compatible, not backward compatible. You can upgrade from 0.9 to 0.10, but not the other way around.
Jul
3
answered Ubuntu. (blockchain of version 0.9.3 compatible with 0.10.1?)
Jul
2
comment RFC6979; (v, r, s), what is v?
That's correct. It was an arbitrary choice for a number at the time, because we needed a byte to convey public key recovery information. I'll try to write a full answer later.
Jun
30
comment What is the function of LOCK(cs_main)?
Theymos: LOCK uses recursive locks, so locking twice should just be a no-op.
Jun
30
comment What is the function of LOCK(cs_main)?
It's automatically released at the end of the scope in which the LOCK is declared. It works similar to a boost::lock, but has some extra debugging logic that can be enabled.
Jun
28
comment P2Pool Hardfork 14.0 where and when is it decided?
Nick: miners have input in the process, because they are part of the ecosystem. But other than for softforks, they do not have any privilege compared to other ecosystem players. Hard forks are about the community as a whole deciding to migrate to an incompatible system.
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