Yoichi Oishi

Japan

Age: 83

I'm 82-year old Japanese male, really old. I worked in a New York-based advertising agency 30 years after working in a local ad agency about 10 years. So my business background was marketing and advertising, though it's irrelevant to my present life now. I'm a user of English Language & Usage site of Stock Exchange more than four years, where I serve as one of moderators. Japanese language is my native language and English is my second language. I studied Chinese language in a Beijing University 20 to 22 years ago. But I almost forgot how to speak it long ago.

6h
comment What does “Retail politics” mean? Is it an established political term?
@Xandar The Zenon. I simply copy/pasted the quoted part from the Conway Daily Sun text. I don't know what are wrong with the text.
13h
asked What does “Retail politics” mean? Is it an established political term?
1d
comment Is “yet” and “ever” interchangeable in “the most pivotal contest yet / ever”
Yah. I looked for the word , "moreso" in an English dictionary in vain, and found Latin, "more suo" instead.
1d
accepted Is “yet” and “ever” interchangeable in “the most pivotal contest yet / ever”
1d
asked Is “yet” and “ever” interchangeable in “the most pivotal contest yet / ever”
2d
accepted Are there English equivalents to “Samurai uses (show off) a toothpick, even he hasn’t eaten anything (for a day)”?
Feb
5
revised Are there English equivalents to “Samurai uses (show off) a toothpick, even he hasn’t eaten anything (for a day)”?
added 3 characters in body
Feb
5
comment Are there English equivalents to “Samurai uses (show off) a toothpick, even he hasn’t eaten anything (for a day)”?
@Josh61. The proverb praises poverty by no means. It admonishes you not to show hungry or troubled face to others, even you are hungry to death or in badly adverse circumstances (if you’re Samurai, or from decent family). It’s referring to the importance of keeping one’s countenance in adversity, a sort of bite-the-bullet like perseverance of Samurai ethic.
Feb
5
comment Are there English equivalents to “Samurai uses (show off) a toothpick, even he hasn’t eaten anything (for a day)”?
@Buisquitboy. I saw your question, and found some commonality in terms of the contrast of inside and outside appearance of a man’s behaviors. But it’s different in that my interest is (1) on the contrast of Samurai, special class people’s self-esteem against adversity, and (2) whether “had a meal” connotes “to fare well” or "be well off" in English language.
Feb
5
revised Are there English equivalents to “Samurai uses (show off) a toothpick, even he hasn’t eaten anything (for a day)”?
added 84 characters in body
Feb
5
asked Are there English equivalents to “Samurai uses (show off) a toothpick, even he hasn’t eaten anything (for a day)”?
Feb
4
revised 私には無理です or 私は無理です
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Feb
4
revised 私には無理です or 私は無理です
added 11 characters in body
Feb
4
revised 私には無理です or 私は無理です
added 3 characters in body
Feb
4
answered 私には無理です or 私は無理です
Feb
4
awarded Famous Question
Feb
1
revised Is the sentence, “He’s too easily prone to pouts and feuds” grammatically right?
added 33 characters in body
Jan
31
revised Is the sentence, “He’s too easily prone to pouts and feuds” grammatically right?
deleted 66 characters in body
Jan
31
accepted Is the sentence, “He’s too easily prone to pouts and feuds” grammatically right?
Jan
31
comment Common ways of asking for someones phone number
@Felectur. Thank you for your concerns on my auditory sense. But, don’t worry, it’s working perfectly. I wrote (あなたの)電話番号を教えていただけませんか? is a standard form of asking question with あなたの in parenthesis. You may or may not use あなたの. You add あなたの、彼の、会社の when you need to specify. I’ve never or seldom at best heard a restaurant / hotel receptionist and shop clerk asks you in blunt way as電話番号を教えていただけませんか without adding あなた様の、お客様の. あなたの電話番号を教えていただけませんか? is nothing special as you make a fuss, unless you’re living in a small village you don’t need to discern people.
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