Yoichi Oishi

Japan

Age: 82

I'm living in Chiba Prefecture near Tokyo, Japan. I worked in both local and multi-national advertising agencies for 40 years. After retiring ad agency, I studied Chinese language (now almost forgotten) in a Beijing university one and a half year. Then coming back to Japan, I worked as a freelance marketing consultant. I'm now totally retired. I still keep learning English and reading English news papers everyday to be abreast with trends du jour. I like travel and photographing. I'm living with my wife as an empty-nester.

Jan
27
awarded Notable Question
Jan
22
accepted The difference between “a President,” “the President,” and “President.”
Jan
21
asked The difference between “a President,” “the President,” and “President.”
Jan
20
awarded Popular Question
Jan
13
accepted Is “two-Perrier” lunch a businessmen’s buzz word?
Jan
13
revised Is “two-Perrier” lunch a businessmen’s buzz word?
edited body
Jan
13
revised Is “two-Perrier” lunch a businessmen’s buzz word?
added 2 characters in body
Jan
13
asked Is “two-Perrier” lunch a businessmen’s buzz word?
Jan
10
accepted What does “Live in one’s own skin” mean?
Jan
9
comment What does “Live in one’s own skin” mean?
Google Ngrams is telling. Could you explain me why it's one's own "skin," not other parts of body, e.g. face, hands, and legs? What does skin represent as a simile?
Jan
9
revised What does “Live in one’s own skin” mean?
added 1 character in body
Jan
9
revised What does “Live in one’s own skin” mean?
deleted 29 characters in body
Jan
9
revised What does “Live in one’s own skin” mean?
deleted 2 characters in body
Jan
9
asked What does “Live in one’s own skin” mean?
Jan
9
comment Are there historic sayings in English equvalent to Japanese “It’s up to you how you comment . But it’s me who take the action after all.”
Cont. 2. Yes, the construct of aphorism, “毀誉は他人の主張。行蔵は我に存す” is “(While) it’s up to you how criticize me, it’s me who should act (or, should have taken an action) on the other hand”.
Jan
9
comment Are there historic sayings in English equvalent to Japanese “It’s up to you how you comment . But it’s me who take the action after all.”
@Amphiteoth.Although I’m not sure if I get your point of question correctly or not, I hope the following would help your understanding the background of the story. 1. Edo is the old name of Tokyo. Maiji government changed the name of Edo into Tokyo literally meaning the Easter Capital. Tokugawa, then actual political ruler of Japan was based in Edo, and the Edo Castle was the stronghold of Tokugawa regime, while Mikado (the Emperor, then a nominal ruler) based in Kyoto.
Jan
8
comment Are there historic sayings in English equvalent to Japanese “It’s up to you how you comment . But it’s me who take the action after all.”
I think "It is not critic" in "The man in arena" exactly corresponds to the situation where Katsu was put under the criticism of Fukuzawa. Katsu served as the advisor to new revolution goverment with belief that he can avail his talent and vision for construction of modern Japan than living as a defeatist hermit.
Jan
8
accepted Are there historic sayings in English equvalent to Japanese “It’s up to you how you comment . But it’s me who take the action after all.”
Jan
7
revised Are there historic sayings in English equvalent to Japanese “It’s up to you how you comment . But it’s me who take the action after all.”
added 1 character in body
Jan
7
revised Are there historic sayings in English equvalent to Japanese “It’s up to you how you comment . But it’s me who take the action after all.”
added 9 characters in body; edited title
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