I develop software, provide technical advice, and manage teams of engineers on behalf of my clients. I am Managing Partner and Co-Founder of Synergy Softworks, a software consultancy and contracting partnership, and CTO and Co-Founder of modelogiq, a financial modeling startup.

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Mar
5
comment Is 'unwind' an appropriate term for describing the shrinking phase of a recursive process?
@JeffSahol, "decurse" is an interesting idea, however there is the possibility of confusion with the the process of elimination of a recursive process; i.e. "decurse" could be understood as the removal of recursive definitions or procedures from a program, either by removing them altogether or by transforming them into iterative equivalents. I would suspect the same goes for "uncurse".
Mar
5
comment Is 'unwind' an appropriate term for describing the shrinking phase of a recursive process?
@JeffSahol, if I understand correctly, you also consider most if not all of the related questions to this one as off topic? Perhaps over the years such questions have become relevant to this se? It seems awkward that the tag programming is used extensively to characterize the now many questions of this very nature, yet this question in particular remains closed. In the interest of consistency with the rest of this se, could you elaborate on why this question should remain closed while most programming-tagged questions of a similar nature remain open?
Mar
4
accepted Are there any terms equivalent to 'Americana' for other cultures?
Mar
3
awarded Commentator
Mar
3
comment Are there any terms equivalent to 'Americana' for other cultures?
It feels like this is an answer to a different question, i.e. what is a less colloquial alternative to 'Americana'. I was looking for equivalent terms (which could be used in place of this term) which describe cultures other than those of the United States.
Mar
3
comment Is 'unwind' an appropriate term for describing the shrinking phase of a recursive process?
@JeffSahol, could you comment on the intended meaning of the 'programming' tag and how this question is off-topic? Most related questions to this one with the 'programming' tag seem to fall into the same category and be of very similar nature, yet have not been closed nor put on hold.
Mar
3
asked Are there any terms equivalent to 'Americana' for other cultures?
Mar
3
comment What are the justifications and historical reasons regarding the choice between the words 'calculus' and 'algebra'?
Cheers @vzn, what do you suggest the title be changed to? On my part there is absolutely no uncertainty on the mathematical meaning of these terms. I asked this question because, for the past few years, every time I speak with physicists and theoretical mathematicians about computing they are confused when we call something a calculus as opposed to an algebra. I have not been able to offer a compelling answer for how these terms transfer from mathematics to computing, and how we chose to call one model a calculus and another an algebra.
Mar
1
comment What are the justifications and historical reasons regarding the choice between the words 'calculus' and 'algebra'?
@usul I think it is not only fair to ask what terminology means and how it came to be, rather, it is imperative; thankfully there is a terminology tag for this very purpose.
Mar
1
awarded Supporter
Mar
1
comment What are the justifications and historical reasons regarding the choice between the words 'calculus' and 'algebra'?
@D.W., any chance of pointing out which of those criteria from the help center make you believe this question to be out of scope?
Mar
1
awarded Citizen Patrol
Mar
1
comment What are the justifications and historical reasons regarding the choice between the words 'calculus' and 'algebra'?
Apologies in advance @D.W. if I have missed the mark on a universal level. The choice of terminology, especially in scientific publications, is of fundamental importance to a field. Perhaps, in addition to repeating Raphael's opinion, you could offer informational content as to why you believe this to not be the case?
Feb
28
comment What are the justifications and historical reasons regarding the choice between the words 'calculus' and 'algebra'?
Where would you have me ask this terminology question, @DavidRicherby? Physicists don't freely interchange the words calculus and algebra, but computer scientists do. Perhaps there is a scientific or historical reason for this.
Feb
28
awarded Editor
Feb
28
revised What are the justifications and historical reasons regarding the choice between the words 'calculus' and 'algebra'?
Fixed accidental typo trailing slashes in URLs.
Feb
28
comment What are the justifications and historical reasons regarding the choice between the words 'calculus' and 'algebra'?
Do you happen to know of any languages which use the equivalent of 'analysis' for the English word 'calculus' which would also translate, say, π-calculus into the corresponding π-'analysis' in that language? From the Wikipedia entry for π-calculus all translations currently available use the equivalent of 'calculus' not 'analysis' (e.g. Cálculo pi in French, Pi-Kalkül in Dutch, Пи-исчисление in Russian, and so on).
Feb
28
awarded Student
Feb
28
asked What are the justifications and historical reasons regarding the choice between the words 'calculus' and 'algebra'?
Jan
28
awarded Supporter
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