Matthias

United Kingdom

Age: 31

Post-doctoral researcher at University College London.

Jun
17
awarded Famous Question
Jun
8
comment multiple dex files define landroid/support/annotation/AnimRes
Define "odd"...
May
27
comment Android: get SMS delivery time
@BerÅ¥ák you are right, sms.getTimestampMillis() carries the time the original message was received by the SMS service centre, which is more or less the same as the time it was sent. My solution (stackoverflow.com/a/30484675/1084488) gives you the value you want, i.e. the time of reception by the recipient (or something very close to that).
May
27
answered Android: get SMS delivery time
Apr
22
comment Android: How to retrieve file name and extension of a resource by resource ID
Turns out it is possible, Aleksandar's solution works!
Apr
19
accepted How to simulate pressing the Android menu button in ARC
Apr
17
comment How to simulate pressing the Android menu button in ARC
@Theyouthis I guess that would work but I was hoping not having to mondify the app.
Apr
17
comment How to simulate pressing the Android menu button in ARC
@CommonsWare Sadly PgUp doesn't do the trick in ARC.
Apr
15
asked How to simulate pressing the Android menu button in ARC
Mar
16
comment java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: View not attached to window manager
@Nick: There is no need to nest multiple if's in cases like this, Java's && operator has lazy evaluation (also called short-circuiting), which means the 2nd operand is not evaluated if the first one evaluates to false (which means the result of the && will always be false anyway, hence "lazy" evaluation). Similarly || will not evaluate its 2nd operand if the first one evaluates to true. Note: the & and | operators do not have this behaviour and thus always evaluate both operands.
Mar
7
awarded Notable Question
Mar
1
awarded Announcer
Feb
24
awarded Yearling
Feb
24
awarded Yearling
Feb
4
comment When to use LinkedList over ArrayList?
I think that, similarly to ArrayList<E>#remove(int index) being O(n - index), you could also argue that LinkedList<E>#remove(int index) is in fact O(index + 1). To see why, consider that removing the first element in a LinkedList could only really be O(1). Who (dis)agrees? [Note that this doesn't mean it is wrong to say that LinkedList<E>#remove(int index) is O(n), because the order of magnitude of index is of course n].
Jan
13
revised How can I normalize the EOL character in Java?
Added the actual code
Jan
13
answered How can I normalize the EOL character in Java?
Jan
7
awarded Notable Question
Jan
6
awarded Popular Question
Nov
20
comment Is there a way to simulate the C++ 'friend' concept in Java?
Very nicely explained, and +1 for poetic coding!
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