Hi, I am a string theorist and a publicist.

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awarded Nice Answer
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revised Quantum entanglement definition
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answered Quantum entanglement definition
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comment How could we travel to the nearest supermassive Black hole?
The total energy of the later states of the Universe would still be zero because the energy is conserved - but there would be both positive and negative contributions. It would be analogous to the pencil.When it's already falling, the potential energy is lower (negative relatively to the initial state) than zero, while the kinetic energy of the pencil is positive. In the Universe, the analogy of the falling pencil would be a cosmic cataclysm (cosmos filled with huge amounts of hot radiation etc.) that would begin immediately.
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comment How could we travel to the nearest supermassive Black hole?
The vacuum has to stay the vacuum, so it must be the state of the Universe with the lowest energy - often labeled by the number zero. If there existed states of negative energy (energy lower than the vacuum's), the set of configurations in which the Universe may be would resemble a pencil standing on its tip. Even if the forces were balanced, any tiny deviation would lead to the pencil's exponentially growing deviation from the unstable position, and the pencil would fall. Similarly, the Universe would get filled with lots of tachyon waves moving everywhere.
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revised Nazi-Germany unemployment?
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comment What did 'regular' medieval people think about royalty?
Right, regular people knew their place and the special status of the aristocracy etc. - which was almost the rule. Today, regular people are brainwashed spoiled brats encouraged by various populist politicians and pundits to think that they are the belly of the world and the higher-status people are never better, at most thieves.
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comment What ds>dQ/T mean?
There is no objective identification which part of the system is the system and which part is the environment. It's the total entropy that grows more than the bound. This extra growth may take place both in the system and in the environment.If the environment has blue and red ink which gets mixed to a purple ink, the entropy of the environment goes up. If the same inks appear within the system, the entropy of the system goes up, even without any heat transfer.
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comment What experiment would disprove string theory?
Dear Philip, my answer makes it quite detailed that this isn't the only way to disprove the theory. However, if you could prove (or back by strong evidence) your statement, it would be a great news for the validity of string theory because that situation would mean that you have proven the theory, in any sensible sense of the word "proof". To think that it would be bad news means to misunderstand the basic rules of logic. The dream of physical theories is to survive (or survive for as long as possible), not to be killed.
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comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
Banks worked much like elsewhere - many of the banks were actually privatized, not nationalized, during Nazism, so Nazism kept the financial industry largely in similar conditions as elsewhere in the capitalist world - but there was nothing original about these steps. Similar privatizations and conditions existed in many other countries. I am just fascinated by the fascination of some people like you by the "wonderful" regime. Its being wonderful was largely a matter of propaganda. People felt happy - to be members of the higher race even they had often nothing else to be proud about.
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comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
It was obviously convenient and good for the economy that they could have banned strikes and other aspects of work of labor unions - I am obviously generally for "this direction" - but it also had some price to pay for the workers. And Volkswagen? What was that great about the conditions in which VW worked then relatively to how it works today, for example? Or how Ford or GM or Laurin&Klement (which would be bought by VW in 1991 LOL) worked at the same time? Hitler claimed some credit for something that wasn't really his. That's the main difference.
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comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
For some broader remarks about the Nazi German economy, see e.g. this general page en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Nazi_Germany - the budget deficit leading to your wonderful GDP figure of 1938 was astronomical, e.g. 38 billion marks of deficit in 1939. No country could routinely sustain a similar system and something "bad" such as the war was needed for this German system to sustain itself - for several more years - even from the economic viewpoint. ... What are the good lessons you want to learn from any of your examples? Nothing was great yet original about the Nazi banks.
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comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
This shouldn't be about Czechoslovakia, however. An important point is that the economic changes of Germany of the 1930s were unsustainable, driven by things that simply couldn't last. The investments into military+troops was a part of it, and those needed to be repaid by expansionism that was pretty much guaranteed to lead to a lost war at some moment. The true sustainable economic boom only started in the post-war German economic miracle.
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comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
The superiority was also clean in 1924. The well-known table in Czechia penize.cz/ekonomika/244016-nas-ucet-za-komunismus says that the top GDP-per-capita countries in 1924 were, in this order: US, Canada, Australia, Switzerland, Argentina, Britain, France, Sweden, Belgium, and Czechoslovakia. If one would separate Czechia and Slovakia (and removed Ruthenia, too), Czechia of 1924 would match France or Sweden at the 7th-8th spot. Germany, Austria were way lower in those tables. This may have helped to create the bad mood for Nazism but Nazism was primarily erasing the gap.
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comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
OK, the 1938 number is clearly a bogus number - it may remove the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia. We had the same GDP per capita e.g. in the mid 1930s and probably higher GDP per capita than Germany in 1930 or early 1930s. This was contributed by the incredible boom, e.g. 10% and 12% GDP growth of Czechoslovakia in 1927, 1929, respectively dejinyasoucasnost.cz/archiv/2008/3/nase-zlata-leta - the timing is different, but the point you are trying to make that this Nazi big-government system beats democracy is just totally and fatally wrong. It's undeniably economically inferior.
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comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
The Czechoslovak economy of the 1930s was - on the per-capita basis - as strong as the German one.
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comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
Dear @PhilipKirkbride, do you have some evidence for your extraordinary claim? Do you claim, for example, that our democratic Czechoslovakia in the 1930s didn't count the "unemployed mothers" among the unemployed people? I can't imagine that. Since 1861, women could actually vote and run for offices and they were treated as equal in almost all respects. Many of them wrote their job as household wives when husbands were OK with that but if they didn't have that, they were unemployed just like any other man. I don't believe it was different in other democratic countries.
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revised Nazi-Germany unemployment?
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revised Nazi-Germany unemployment?
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revised Nazi-Germany unemployment?
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