Helder Velez

Lisbon, Portugal

Age: 61


A self-similar model of the Universe unveils the nature of dark energy

Because we measure the atoms with the atoms and all the equations of physics hold good whatever the atomic size in this document is presented a formal proof that a SHRINKING ATOM is the cause of the space expansion. No dark energy, no BB, no space expansion, no inflation,...


A new Evolving Climate Model (ECM) and NO Snowball Earth

A Model of Past Earth’s Climate from Isotopic and Biologic Data and Its Relationship with Orbits’ Expansion
Abstract: The first model of the past hot Earth’s climate consistently indicated by isotopic and biologic data.. This model.. Evolving Climate Model (ECM), accurately matches a 3 Gy long compilation of $\delta^{18}O$ data. An important consequence is the ...well-known but until now mysterious occurrence: the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE). A solution ..for.. “dolomite problem” and new explanations ..for..the origin of petroleum and of protocontinents. ..the ECM presents ideal conditions for the massive production of long organic molecules... life evolution, .. the Cambrian.. explained and fitted by the ECM, exposing a previously unknown connection between the evolution of life and climate. The most likely cause.. is the expansion of orbits;... can explain the ECM, the receding of the Moon and the water on early Mars..


If you do not agree with the proof then post your answer to this post: PSE-How to distinguish between the spectrum of an atom in motion and the one of a scaled atom?.
Note: I've a lot of persistent downvoters and they always refused to write the why they think that I'm wrong, even now that I'd offered 500 points for answers against my position.

Online book, by Alfredo Gouveia de Oliveira http://outrafisica.blogs.sapo.pt. Using only standard physics, the author presents an alternative view of the History of the Universe.

papers of in the arxiv:

20h
answered Wave Equation - Vibrations & Waves
Apr
16
asked measuring distances
Apr
14
answered Are circles stronger than triangles?
Apr
14
answered Why do we use capacitors when batteries can very well store charges?
Apr
14
comment Does the second law of thermodynamics take into consideration interactions between particles?
The question is about the general validity of thermodynamic laws under gravity and there is no need to justify any cosmological model as long as a finite gravitational speed of the interaction exists (I should have mention it). @gatsu: see the notion in this PSE-Q I showed that a large enough or infinite universe will not collapse under gravity (against..). I'd love to see arguments instead of vagueness.
Apr
14
comment Does the second law of thermodynamics take into consideration interactions between particles?
@gatsu: it is about gravitational physics in a large universe starting at 0K (not seen elsewhere). I've done my best to ease the presentation to all. I'd appreciate to know what is not clear or to see your own answer or objections.
Apr
14
answered Does the second law of thermodynamics take into consideration interactions between particles?
Apr
10
comment How to distinguish between the spectrum of an atom in motion and the one of a scaled atom?
I've studied Nuclear Physics, searched the data, and found no way to show what I expected (see previous comment): SO FAR THERE IS NO WAY TO DISTINGUISH THE MODELS. OCCAN' RAZOR sould be called. My model has ONE parameter only, $H_0$, against SIX of the SM.
Apr
9
awarded Tenacious
Apr
7
comment Why is there a negative sign in front of the optical wave?
@Lenzuola I've added a long story to my answer.
Apr
7
revised Why is there a negative sign in front of the optical wave?
clearing misinterpretations on complex plane, time and wave equation
Apr
6
answered Why is there a negative sign in front of the optical wave?
Apr
1
answered How can we justify dropping the absolute time hypothesis?
Mar
31
comment Why does the light instantly disappear when we switch off the source?
last year: light stopped during 1 minute
Mar
31
revised Is there a black hole in the centre of the Milky Way?
one more reason
Mar
31
comment Is there a black hole in the centre of the Milky Way?
Physics is not done by consensus. If we have 100 reasons to say yes and I have 1 founded reason to say NO then I win. Unfair? That's the way it used to be in the past of physics, if no one can rule out my NO. We can make a zillion of simulations with a central force and will never get a lopsided galaxy: (I'm sensible to arguments, like ONE single simulation for instance, not to downvotes).
Mar
31
comment Is this the reason why acceleration is said absolute?
IMO: it is not true: 'The observer, however, still sees just the two forces there were acting before' . In fact the observer will feel, and measure, the kick of the seat in his back side, or on any accelerometer (use the smartphone, if you wish). But your conclusion is correct.
Mar
31
answered Is there a black hole in the centre of the Milky Way?
Mar
31
comment Is there a black hole in the centre of the Milky Way?
the answer correctly points to the 'correlation between black-hole size and host galaxy' (google that sentence for images and observe the charts). The Gwave is not positing a this cause -- that effect. All the answers stress that the BH is very small irt the galactic size and then any correlation appears without a justification, imo (that is why the answer says: 'We don't really know why'). I do not understand why Lubos is assuming: 'more natural'.
Mar
30
comment In $1$-dimensional space, how would the gravity generated by an electron affect a photon moving away from the electron if the photon can’t slow down?
@Jimnosperm : see Jerry's answer to PSE-here. In short: we have an expectation based on theory but we have not 'experimental evidence'.
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