My past research interests included differential algebraic equations, nonlinear analysis and relations between symmetries and structural properties.

I recently investigated hierarchical structures, starting from group cohomology, continuing with semi-group theory and ending with lattices and universal algebra.

1d
reviewed Leave Open Can there be ugliness in the world of a Mathematical God?
1d
reviewed Leave Open The birth of Buddha
1d
reviewed Leave Open When writing, why would a conclusion precede a premise?
1d
reviewed Close Rationalism and Empiricism
1d
reviewed Leave Open Why does human race has to survive and continue to exist?
1d
reviewed Looks Good Why does human race has to survive and continue to exist?
2d
reviewed Close The-Egyptian-Book-of-the-Dead Question on "Osiris Ani"
2d
reviewed Close 'the unexamined life is not worth living'
2d
reviewed Reviewed Calculate contour line length
2d
answered Sparse iterative out-of-core parallel solver
Apr
15
reviewed Leave Open Concrete language as a manifestation of Being
Apr
15
reviewed Leave Open I need help with essay question: "'No act is intrinsically criminal'. Discuss"
Apr
15
reviewed Leave Open Can we tell we are not fictional characters under a loop of writers?
Apr
15
awarded Promoter
Apr
15
reviewed Reviewed Explain this multivariate differential identity
Apr
15
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Could anyone help me with dde23 function
Apr
15
asked Can F-cycle substitue FMG for update of existent solution?
Apr
13
comment Does the "equality semigroup" have an accepted name?
If you introduce the name "subatom" for an element which is either the bottom or an "atom", then you can no longer pretend that you are using established terminology. If you slightly abuse existing terminology on the other hand, then you are just following established mathematical practice. (red herring principle...)
Apr
13
comment Does the "equality semigroup" have an accepted name?
In any partial ordered set with a bottom element, the meet-semilattice of atoms (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atom_(order_theory)) is a well-defined semilattice. So I would call it just this: "meet-semilattice of atoms".
Apr
13
comment How do mathematicians find formulas?
@YvesDaoust The point of this answer are neither the Bessel functions nor the Fourier transforms. The point is that new formulas arise out of a perceived necessity in a context where you are already familiar with related formulas, and have access to additional resources to allow efficient guesswork.
1 2 3 4 5