1d
awarded Notable Question
Aug
20
comment Number of publications by year on a given subject
Google has the overwhelming majority of "articles" published in peer-reviewed journals, so I would not argue that it is missing much, unless you are interested in conference abstracts and such.
Aug
13
awarded Disciplined
Aug
8
comment Why there are two different results?
I should perhaps mention that the title is literally a duplication of stats.stackexchange.com/questions/33888/…
Aug
7
answered How strongly supported is a conclusion drawn from the correlation of 10 observations?
Jul
29
comment When is it appropriate to add references to own papers on Wikipedia?
I think this is a ridiculous recommendation. What if you want to help write the article on a new species of bird and one of your papers is the only one describing its wingspan? If would be ludicrous not to cite your paper.
Jul
28
comment How include contributions to a manuscript of a paper in CV
Yes this is true, but I would not put that it is the "intended journal of publication" as written in your answer.
Jul
28
comment How include contributions to a manuscript of a paper in CV
I would write with (in preparation) instead of where the year would go. I would not put intended journal of publication, that is a bit presumptuous to me.
Jul
21
awarded Enlightened
Jul
15
comment Why don't all disciplines follow a double-blind review system?
Are more than 50% of manuscripts really published before formal peer-review? That is interesting indeed. But still, I see this only applying to some disciplines.
Jul
15
comment Is it necessary to wear a white shirt inside the graduation gown for Masters degree graduation ceremony?
I do not think it is necessary, and my memory suggests that many people wear other colors. I would probably wear a white shirt, but I doubt you would stand out very severely if you did not. Light blue would work pretty well I reckon.
Jul
14
comment How to test (admitted) grad students before hiring them in your lab
What I am saying is that testing, either subjective or objective testing, are two ways of "knowing more about a person". An interview is also a test. Also, Albert Einstein was tested and he was indeed an excellent student (skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/956/…).
Jul
14
comment Why don't all disciplines follow a double-blind review system?
I don't think the argument that "review often can't be double-blind" is an argument against the benefits of using double-blind review. Just because some articles in some disciplines sometimes would already be published with a name, does not mean that the journals cannot try to do double-blind review.
Jul
14
comment Is there added value in having your own presentation layout and using it consistently?
Why would having your own "signature" layout result in people thing they have "all those weird colours"? Is it not possible to have a signature layout that is appealing to the eyes? What if people said "Look at that speaker with the cool results and they have these great slides they use all the time".
Jul
14
comment How to test (admitted) grad students before hiring them in your lab
The statement "I don't think it is fair to judge a person by tests" is a bit ridiculous. Sure, perhaps individuals should not be judged solely based on formal examinations, but to say individuals should not be judged at all based on examinations undermines entire fields of valuable practice and research. Tests are useful. What would an "overall profile" be if not comprised of a variety of subjective and objective tests? Also, what you are recommending are small tests.
Jul
10
awarded Custodian
Jul
9
awarded Nice Question
Jul
9
awarded Popular Question
Jul
8
comment What to do with negative research outcomes (results) of PhD research experiment?
I think it is very important to know what exactly failed. If, for example, the experiment failed due to methodological problems, then starting over at least partially might be needed. If everything worked fine, but no findings were discovered, then starting over might not be necessary. No findings using good science is still good science.
Jul
7
accepted Is it better to use data imputation for missing data or an analysis that is not affected by missing data (e.g., HLM/mixed effects modelling)?
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