May
13
awarded Student
Apr
10
awarded Tumbleweed
Jan
16
comment More dastardly dashes: what are the 'horizontal bar' and 'figure dash' characters for?
That's not good enough. The FAQ specifically welcomes questions on punctuation, and you still haven't distinguished this from the other question which is not closed and has a decent rating. I think you've applied your own rules wrongly, or at least inconsistently, which isn't fair. Notwithstanding that it's been answered, I'd like you to reopen this question, because it's not off topic according to the FAQ.
Jan
16
awarded Scholar
Jan
16
accepted More dastardly dashes: what are the 'horizontal bar' and 'figure dash' characters for?
Jan
16
comment More dastardly dashes: what are the 'horizontal bar' and 'figure dash' characters for?
Can you please explain why a) this is not a question about "Spelling and punctuation, and b) the other question (first link in my post) is not also off-topic?
Jan
9
asked More dastardly dashes: what are the 'horizontal bar' and 'figure dash' characters for?
Nov
30
accepted When using (only) a templating system, how should I manage CSS, javascript etc for sub-templates?
Nov
30
answered When using (only) a templating system, how should I manage CSS, javascript etc for sub-templates?
Nov
30
comment When using (only) a templating system, how should I manage CSS, javascript etc for sub-templates?
As Douglas Adams taught us, there are times when the answer becomes obvious once you know the question. In this case the keyword I was missing was "template inheritance". Thanks for pointing me in the right direction.
Nov
19
asked When using (only) a templating system, how should I manage CSS, javascript etc for sub-templates?
Oct
14
awarded Supporter
Aug
17
comment What is the most efficient way to find the relative XPath between two elements?
(Ack... It's a little unintuitive that the textareas for comments submit immediately on <Enter> when those for the original questions do not. Anyway...) The objective is to analyse a large number of websites using 'rules' along lines of, "if $node1 exists, grab the data in $node2". There may be multiple nodes matching the description of $node1 on a given page, at unpredictable points in the markup, but the target data can always be found in an element with a common relation to it, eg "2nd <li> child of the 1st enclosing <div>" or the like.
Aug
17
awarded Scholar
Aug
17
comment What is the most efficient way to find the relative XPath between two elements?
I was careful not to include that ;) Don't get me wrong, I do fully appreciate when Perlfolk point out to me that the very question is wrong, but in this case I was pretty interested in the intellectual exercise, as you said.
Aug
17
accepted What is the most efficient way to find the relative XPath between two elements?
Aug
17
comment What is the most efficient way to find the relative XPath between two elements?
Ah, much cleverer than my suggestion - and thank you for showing how you analysed the problem. I think ikegami's answer met the terms of my question the best, but your answer would be useful for working with *ML tree manipulation modules were XPath isn't available, eg Mojo::DOM. Will reply again if I come up with an elegant way of representing the relationship, although that will most likely be XPath- or module-dependant. Many thanks.
Aug
17
comment What is the most efficient way to find the relative XPath between two elements?
Beautiful! Many thanks.
Aug
16
awarded Student
Aug
16
asked What is the most efficient way to find the relative XPath between two elements?