Jared

United States

Age: 21

Computer science, computer engineering, and electrical engineering undergraduate student. Typically encountered writing in C, C++, Objective-C, and Python.

Jan
27
awarded Autobiographer
Dec
26
comment Is Array<Bool> optimized for space?
Swift's young age is actually the reason that I am asking the question. I could only speculate on why if I knew whether such an optimization exists, which I do not. I was hoping someone with better debugging skills than myself would be able to perform some lldb magic to discover the answer.
Dec
26
awarded Citizen Patrol
Dec
26
comment Is Array<Bool> optimized for space?
Was really scratching my head over that one too. One vote to close for being "primarily opinion-based." Huh. Pretty sure asking about compiler specs are as objective as questions get.
Dec
26
asked Is Array<Bool> optimized for space?
Nov
19
accepted Can I automatically create a class instance from a numerical value where needed?
Nov
19
asked Can I automatically create a class instance from a numerical value where needed?
Oct
18
awarded Editor
Oct
18
comment How do I design a hash function for this given case?
First time using LaTeX. Thanks for the pointer to the guide.
Oct
18
revised How do I design a hash function for this given case?
Added LaTeX formatting
Oct
18
awarded Autobiographer
Oct
18
asked How do I design a hash function for this given case?
Oct
6
comment How do I prove that any function is O(...) /Θ(...) /Ω(...)?
I recognize the answer to the second question as the ratio test from Calculus II, and it looks extremely useful for my situation, but I'm unconfident in how to apply it. For example, how could I use it to solve the second example I gave?
Oct
6
comment How do I prove that any function is O(...) /Θ(...) /Ω(...)?
A user proved the first example I listed here in the accepted answer. I understand the proof, but what I am wanting to know is his thought process in coming up with the proof so I can use that thought process to create proofs for functions like the other two examples.
Oct
6
comment How do I prove that any function is O(...) /Θ(...) /Ω(...)?
The third question you've posted looks hopeful and I'm reading through it, thank you. I understand that 2^(n+1)=O(2^n) means that the function has a runtime of "at worst, 2^n" meaning that the upper-bound of the runtime curve would be the function y=2^x. However, I don't understand what goes in to proving this statement. I've never written a proof in my life, and the format of the proofs that I've seen intimidate me. I don't know what writing one entails, and I don't think I've been equipped to write one myself and be confident that it is correct.
Oct
6
awarded Autobiographer
Oct
6
awarded Editor
Oct
6
comment How do I prove that any function is O(...) /Θ(...) /Ω(...)?
Neither question you've given is related at all. Sorry.
Oct
6
revised How do I prove that any function is O(...) /Θ(...) /Ω(...)?
Had to edit to assert my question is different from a suggested related problem that isn't related whatsoever.
Oct
6
asked How do I prove that any function is O(...) /Θ(...) /Ω(...)?
1 2 3 4 5