hardmath

Knoxville, TN

uclue.com

Age: 61

Enjoys programming in Prolog.

Richard O'Keefe: "Prolog is an efficient programming language because it is a very stupid theorem prover."

When I cross the street, I look both ways: up and dn.

7h
answered How to create a computationally cheap function passing through given points?
10h
reviewed Leave Open How do I take the 100th derivative of a polynomial
10h
comment Arithmetic functions of particular type
You can easily fix your example by composing an increasing function $f$ with $\pi(x)$ (although the OP seems a little ambivalent about whether strictly increasing is the only case of interest).
11h
reviewed Close Clarification regarding Drinker's paradox
11h
reviewed Leave Open Maple: How do I type "solve" with an arrow under?
11h
reviewed Looks Good Limit radius of convergence $ S = \sum^\infty_{n=0} \frac{(n + 1)!}{8^n} $
11h
comment How to create a computationally cheap function passing through given points?
Since it has roughly the appearance of a hyperbola, I pulled the data into a spreadsheet and calculated the $x\cdot y$ values. These vary "unimodally" with $x$ (the first coordinate), suggesting a fit of the form $y = p(x)/x$ where $p(x)$ is a quadratic polynomial.
11h
comment Arithmetic functions of particular type
Of course it does have the advantage of being natural and interesting!
11h
reviewed Reviewed How to create a computationally cheap function passing through given points?
11h
reviewed Looks Good Arithmetic functions of particular type
11h
comment Arithmetic functions of particular type
Since the change in value at primes is always +1 for $\pi(x)$, it seems this doesn't (in spirit) meet the requirement that "increase in value at primes depend[s] on the value of the prime" and "I am not looking for summation of delta functions at primes".
13h
comment elementary number theory (greater integer function ) problem?
The problem comes down to whether $n!$ can have exactly 37 factors of 5 (as hinted in Edward Jiang's Answer). For the general approach, see the "abstract duplicate".
21h
comment Solving a circular permutation problem with recursion
It's hard to follow, esp. in the case $m\neq n$. How exactly does "$c$ only [depend] on $n,m,t$"? Since we are studying when $k=0$, it seems that a discussion of how the recursion behaves on these cases. Perhaps a worked example $f(6,m,0)$ would clear things up?
1d
reviewed Looks Good I do not understand the last step of this proof.
1d
reviewed Leave Closed Solve Basic partial differential equation question
1d
reviewed Close doppler effect... how does this image explain it?
1d
comment How to sum up this series and simplify yet another one?
What motivated these Questions? Some context would be helpful to a Reader willing to provide useful information.
1d
reviewed Leave Open $a=3X^2+X+2 \in \mathbb{Z}_7[X]$. Compute the inverse of $[a]$ in $\mathbb{Z}_7[X]/(X^3+4)$
1d
reviewed Close if $f'(x) = -8xe^{x^2}$ and $f(0)=3$ then $f(x) =$?
1d
reviewed Close Assigning value in a marketplace
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