Noldorin

London, United Kingdom

noldorin.com

Age: 24

entrepreneur; graduate in mathematics / theoretical computer science / theoretical physics; polymath-in-training

based in London, United Kingdom

2h
comment Which country traces its roots back to the oldest civilization?
Cultural heritage? Again, extremely hard to discern, but they certainly left legacies of epic literature, book-keeping & accountancy, and many other things that influenced later civilisations, in particular via the Assyrians again. You'd have to ask an expert on Sumerian culture to get a real answer about this though.
2h
comment Which country traces its roots back to the oldest civilization?
As for linguistic descent, there are no living descendent of Sumerian, although a number of loanwords entered Assyrian and other Semitic languages, and have been passed down into modern languages. See e.g. "cane" in England (etymonline.com/index.php?search=cane). I'm sure Syriac (which still exists as a liturgical language) has a number of Sumerian loanwords, though I can't list them off the top of my head.
2h
comment Which country traces its roots back to the oldest civilization?
@Mr.Bultitude: In brief summary of a very complex issue: technological heritage was immediately the Assyrians (who later conquered the region), the entire Middle East, the Mediterranean and Indian civilisations, then the whole world in time. Ethnic? Very hard to tell, although there's nothing to suggest the Sumerians were wiped out. They lost their identity over time thanks to the Assyrians & Babylonians, but I'm sure many modern Iraqis, Syrians, Jordanians, and people far wider afield have a little Sumerian ancestry if you go back far enough!
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comment Julius Caesar's view on Celts and Germans
Sure, as Rome used barbarian troops through its history (especially in cavalry). I'm afraid I have to disagree though; it does seem like he actively scorned their culture... he considered them even more barbaric and threatening than the Celts, on account of what appeared to him like an unbridled warlike aggression. I believe there is a well-cited quote saying he wished to eradicate them completely (though perhaps I'm getting this muddled with Marcus Aurelius in his Marcomannic Wars).
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