Experimental nuclear and particle physicist. These days I'm teaching, but I've spent a lot of time on nucleon structure in fixed target electron scattering and neutrino oscillations using reactors and beam sources.

Been reading Zemansky & Dittman's book on thermodynamics recently. Quote: ``The concept of temperature is rich in interpretations and levels of abstraction.'' Nice.

7h
comment How did Einstein know tensors would be needed in the EFEs?
We discourage cross-posting, but if you don't get a satisfactory response in, say, two days flag it for moderator attention and ask to have it moved. We have the power.
7h
comment How did Einstein know tensors would be needed in the EFEs?
BTW, while this question is fine on Physics SE, it would also have been good on the new history of science and math beta site.
10h
comment Do all subatomic particles create interference patterns in the double slit experiment?
Ray, you seem to ask questions just because they have come to mind without putting in much search time first. Sooner or later that's going to annoy some of our regular users. Doing some basic research is part of what is expected of question posters. In particular reading the Wikipedia and searching other question on this site is certainly the *bare minimum*.
10h
comment Do all subatomic particles create interference patterns in the double slit experiment?
Related: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/131714/…
10h
comment Do all subatomic particles create interference patterns in the double slit experiment?
And neutrons and buckyballs.
10h
answered Why do scientists use a different method from redshift to find the distance of distant galaxies?
12h
comment Absolute (as opposed to relative) concept of inertial frame
@2012rcampion Nicely stated, I've incorporated a version of that argument into my text. Thanks.
12h
revised Absolute (as opposed to relative) concept of inertial frame
incorporate 2012rcampion's formulation of how to identify the pseudo-forces of linear motion
13h
comment How the Moon causes the tides?
As a practical matter, you are not going to be able to compute actual tides using the toy models that appear in Physics SE answers about tides. The real tides in our real oceans are strongly affected by resonant sloshing in ocean basins at all scales. Coming to grips with that will be quite a project even after you've overcome the hurdle in front of you right now.
14h
comment What are the equations of motion that model near light speed orbits of a massive body about incredibly massive bodies?
Not a specialist here, but I suppose that those trajectories are evaluated on a Kerr metric. Whether by closed form solution or numeric integration I couldn't tell you.
15h
comment Absolute (as opposed to relative) concept of inertial frame
You're asking all the right questions. The pseudo-forces arising from rotating coordinate systems all have an explicit dependence on position. Alas the ones arising from straight-line accelerating coordinate systems don't; they are just a ever present acceleration term (kinda like gravity in a near-the-surface-of-the-earth lab; but then gravity is a pseudo-force in GR).
15h
revised Absolute (as opposed to relative) concept of inertial frame
deleted 8 characters in body
15h
comment Absolute (as opposed to relative) concept of inertial frame
@LuisMendo Well, that is the harder problem. The best I've got for you is "If the laws of physics take on their simplest form (i.e. without pseudo-forces) in your current reference frame, then you are in an inertial frame." That's what John is getting at. Only he's trying to boot the discussion all the way to GR. I stuck with the Newtonian concept here, because I find it easier to start there and move up.
15h
answered Absolute (as opposed to relative) concept of inertial frame
16h
comment Are experimental tests of general relativity out of mainstream physics?
I'll also repeat the advice you recieved previous: directing name-calling at the same people whose minds you would like to change is foolhardy.
16h
comment Are experimental tests of general relativity out of mainstream physics?
I note that after the last time you posted about this on meta, a moderator undeleted those posts so that the community could take a second look at them. They were then caught up in the site-cleanup again because the users of this site simply disagree with you.
16h
revised Are experimental tests of general relativity out of mainstream physics?
added 299 characters in body
1d
comment How are quarks and leptons detected experimentally?
This is a good answer, but you make some statements about the selection of detector elements that are only true in the high-energy collider world. Other kinds of PID than calorimetry are widely used at lower energies.
1d
comment At what rate does light 'bend' around the surface of the earth?
It is not necessary that Newton knew it, you can still use his mechanics to make a prediction.
1d
comment If the solar system is a non-inertial frame, why can Newton's Laws predict motion?
@LuisMendo In Newtonian mechanics acceleration is not relative; that is, it is measured to be the same in all inertial references frames. The situation in relativity requires more math, but in essence special relativity also has a comparable property. General relativity is a whole 'nother ball game but can be completely neglected for this problem.
1 2 3 4 5