Fred Kline

Seattle, WA

Age: 71

Contact: rudytoody.AT.comcast.DOT.net

I retired in 2006 and bought Mathematica and a stack of math books with the goal to teach myself to become a world-class mathematician. I am on pace to achieve that goal sometime shortly after the next Ice Age.

I consider myself a Mathematical Mutt (no papers) who occasionally ventures off the back porch to play in the yard with the big dogs.

I donate regularly to the The OEIS Foundation.

When I look at the patterns, I can hear the wheels turning. When I look at the math, I find out the hamsters have died.

Jul
11
comment Under the Gregorian calendar, what days can never be Easter?
This calculation will work most of the time. In some religions, observers watch for the full moon and then name the date. Their full moon can be different from the astronomical full moon. (human error?)
Jul
11
accepted Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
Jul
11
comment Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
...which I guess this is, but it's a bit contrived.
Jul
11
comment Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
I was looking to show the outer sum is always absolute.$$ \sum_{n=1}^\infty \bigg( | \sum_{d\mid\#_n} \mu(d) | \bigg)$$
Jul
11
comment Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
@GregMartin, should I have placed parentheses as you have?
Jul
11
comment Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
@GregMartin, can you make that an answer so I can accept it?
Jul
11
asked Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
Jul
10
accepted Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
Jul
10
revised Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
added alternate statement
Jul
10
comment Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
@MichaelHardy, possibly partial products?
Jul
10
comment Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
@MichaelHardy, I got the second line from OEIS,
Jul
10
comment Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
@MichaelHardy, second is good. The first is more complicated. We take the divisors of the product of the first $n$ primes. The we sum those divisors while applying the sign using $\mu$.
Jul
10
asked Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
Jun
3
revised Can you help with Syracuse (3x+1)/2 disjoint tree graph set-builder notation?
hid some complexity
Jun
2
revised Can you help with Syracuse (3x+1)/2 disjoint tree graph set-builder notation?
Fixed syntax, inserted wedges
Jun
2
comment Possible improvements to this Syracuse (3x+1)/2 graph?
I like it. My new version is based the prism I use in my proofs. So, I think I will be using both methods for the graphing part of the paper. Should I delete the temporary answer now?
Jun
2
comment Can you help with Syracuse (3x+1)/2 disjoint tree graph set-builder notation?
@Ken, I posted my approach, a little late because my inter-net was out. Let's find out if I paid attention.
Jun
2
revised Can you help with Syracuse (3x+1)/2 disjoint tree graph set-builder notation?
added major revisions per comments
Jun
2
comment A verb meaning "to look around making sure no one sees you"
+1, I had to register just so I could vote for "...had the neck of an owl."
Jun
2
awarded Supporter
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