Fred Kline

Seattle, WA

Age: 70

I retired in 2006 and bought Mathematica and a stack of math books with the goal to teach myself to become a world-class mathematician. I am on pace to achieve that goal sometime shortly after the next Ice Age.

I consider myself a Mathematical Mutt (no papers) who occasionally ventures off the back porch to play in the yard with the big dogs.

I donate regularly to the The OEIS Foundation.

When I look at the patterns, I can hear the wheels turning. When I look at the math, I find out the hamsters have died.

1d
comment Cleaning up post that has been cited by OEIS
@user1729, third person is a stylistic method used in math papers.
1d
comment Cleaning up post that has been cited by OEIS
@user1729, I inserted the Mathematica code and the formula into the two OEIS sequences (subject to approval by the editors.) The link was inserted by someone else.
2d
accepted Cleaning up post that has been cited by OEIS
Jul
19
asked Cleaning up post that has been cited by OEIS
Jul
17
revised Identity for frequency of integers with smallest prime(n) divisor
Cleaned up a few things
Jul
16
accepted Identity for frequency of integers with smallest prime(n) divisor
Jul
15
revised Identity for frequency of integers with smallest prime(n) divisor
fixed identity
Jul
15
revised Identity for frequency of integers with smallest prime(n) divisor
added Mathematica code to show identity
Jul
15
revised Identity for frequency of integers with smallest prime(n) divisor
added more info
Jul
14
revised Identity for frequency of integers with smallest prime(n) divisor
added more info per suggestion in comment
Jul
14
revised Identity for frequency of integers with smallest prime(n) divisor
elaborated on question
Jul
14
asked Identity for frequency of integers with smallest prime(n) divisor
Jul
14
answered Is there a list of typical variable letters to use in a given context?
Jul
4
revised $\prod_{n=1}^{\infty} n^{\mu(n)}=\frac{1}{4 \pi ^2}$
expanded link description
Jul
4
revised $\prod_{n=1}^{\infty} n^{\mu(n)}=\frac{1}{4 \pi ^2}$
removed two previous edits which no longer apply to the problem
Jul
4
comment $\prod_{n=1}^{\infty} n^{\mu(n)}=\frac{1}{4 \pi ^2}$
@MichaelHardy, thanks for the edit. Thanks for the notation tip.
Jul
4
revised $\prod_{n=1}^{\infty} n^{\mu(n)}=\frac{1}{4 \pi ^2}$
added a link to the reciprocal
Jul
3
comment Why isn't $1$ a superior highly composite number?
+1 for interesting question. The only pattern difference I see is the parity (1 is odd, all others are even). However, I can't say that that is the reason.
Jul
2
awarded Curious
Jul
2
awarded Curious
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