8h
answered Updating Paper Status after Applying to Graduate School
9h
comment Refusing to cite paywalled papers
(Incidentally, I think authors do have a scholarly obligation to make their work as widely available as reasonably possible. But much of the world apparently disagrees, as judged by their publishing behavior.)
9h
comment Refusing to cite paywalled papers
@KennyPeanuts: The scholarly obligation is to cite, not to acquire. If you are aware of a paper, you can't pretend you don't know about it just because you don't want to track down a copy or can't. Of course citing a paper you haven't seen is awkward and can look bad. In practice it's almost always worth the effort of tracking it down. But the difference is that omitting the paper entirely is unethical, while citing it with an explanation that sources say it contains something but you do not have access to it is unusual but ethical.
9h
comment Refusing to cite paywalled papers
@KennyPeanuts: You can't pretend you are unaware of papers you don't want to acquire. If you've heard that a paper contains something or you suspect it based on the title/abstract,
13h
awarded Good Answer
16h
comment Refusing to cite paywalled papers
@DanRomik: Good point.
17h
awarded Nice Answer
18h
answered Refusing to cite paywalled papers
Feb
5
answered Is it legal for a US professor to require remuneration from the foreigner for consulting services?
Feb
5
answered Asking a professor whether my application has been accepted or not
Feb
2
comment Professors who excel in everything they do
@jakebeal: I wouldn't say it is too broad, but I'm not sure it's on topic (none of the comments so far says anything specific to academia).
Feb
2
comment The ideal period to finish the Ph.D
It's hard to say what this means without knowing the context. If it means "an average student who works 40 hours a week can expect to receive a doctorate within one year of entering graduate school", then it's ridiculous. If it means "you should feel bad if it takes you more than a year to complete your dissertation research", then it's wrong. If it means "after mostly completing your research, you should be able to write your thesis within one year, even while teaching and applying for jobs", then it's a reasonable timeframe under normal circumstances, but not all circumstances are normal.
Feb
2
comment Professors who excel in everything they do
I don't think there's anything special about professors here. In any field of human endeavor, a few people excel in many different respects. One obvious explanation is that talent, effort, and preparation vary dramatically between people. Another is that success breeds success: once you achieve some success, the world is more likely to offer you the support needed to achieve further success.
Feb
2
answered How to create an editorial board for a new journal
Jan
21
comment How to publish an [La]TeXified version of an old typewritten book in mathematics?
It's also worth asking a librarian for help in tracking down the publisher. Typewritten mathematics books were most common from the 1950's through 70's, and I think there are few (if any) mainstream mathematics publishers from that period who have gone out of business completely. The most likely scenario is that they were bought by a company with a different name (possibly several times in succession).
Jan
18
comment How common are shortlist notifications for math postdocs?
Regarding whether you should panic, the answer is no, but see here for advice about what to do at different times in this process.
Jan
18
answered How common are shortlist notifications for math postdocs?
Jan
18
awarded Guru
Jan
16
comment Is transferring to another university an option for an unhappy PhD student?
@Pandora: It's not so much that it's negative, but that the committee may not believe other reasons. Applicants sometimes outline personal or intellectual reasons why they feel a certain department would be a much better fit for them, only to have the committee basically ignore the stated reasons on the grounds that they are just an excuse.
Jan
16
comment Hobby during PhD studies has taken its toll, how do I recover?
I sympathize with your situation, but I'm not sure it's really on topic here. I don't think the academic setting plays any specific role, and what you should be doing now in terms of research or your studies is exactly the same as what you would have been doing if you hadn't made this detour. Instead, the important question is how to avoid feeling guilty or depressed. That's a good question, but it's not really about academia.
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