Samuel Tinguely

Geneva

Age: 26

I'm currently a PhD student in the university of Geneva. For the moment, I work mainly in algebraic topology.
Jul
2
awarded Curious
Mar
20
awarded Yearling
Mar
20
awarded Yearling
Jun
25
awarded Tumbleweed
Jun
20
answered Quotient geometries known in popular culture, such as "flat torus = Asteroids video game"
Jun
18
accepted Why is the equivariant Euler class a character ?
Jun
18
comment Why is the equivariant Euler class a character ?
Okay, fine, now I understand. Thank you for this neat answer ! =D
Jun
18
awarded Yearling
Jun
18
answered Why is the equivariant Euler class a character ?
Jun
18
awarded Commentator
Jun
18
comment Why is the equivariant Euler class a character ?
I can only see the first sentence as a rephrasing of my question. Is the map you're talking about the identification between $H^\ast_T(pt)$ and $ST^\ast$ ? If yes, why must it map a weight to the corresponding line bundle over a point ? If not, what is it ?
Jun
17
asked Why is the equivariant Euler class a character ?
Jun
12
comment Why is the Lie derivative linear in the vector field?
Yeah, exactly ! It's a great way to put it, thanks !
Jun
11
comment Why is the Lie derivative linear in the vector field?
Oh, yes, I failed to see this. >_< Thank you ! =)
Jun
11
accepted Why is the Lie derivative linear in the vector field?
Jun
11
comment Why is the Lie derivative linear in the vector field?
Well, yes, but how the to prove that this is linear ? And it is the Lie derivative with respect to the vector field generated by $X$ and the action of $G$.
Jun
10
asked Why is the Lie derivative linear in the vector field?
May
31
comment a counterexample of covering projection
Just to be sure, I suppose that by $\vee X_n$ you mean their disjoint union ? And what makes you think that `no open subset of $X$ is evenly covered by $p$' ? I think on the contrary that $X$ is evenly covered by an countable dicrete fibre.
May
31
comment Polynomials are continuous with respect to the Zariski topology
I suppose you want to call the original polynomial $F$, and that you mean that the set of points such that $F(x_1,...,x_n)-p=0$ is the zero-locus of a polynomial, and hence closed ? (because it is certainly not finite)
May
31
comment Polynomials are continuous with respect to the Zariski topology
This looks more like a homework problem than a true question. Perhaps should it be re-tagged accordingly ? Also, what have you already tried ?
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