JLG

United States (Flyover Country)

Editor for 30 years, mostly for veterinary/medical publications

1d
comment Does one include a comma after the last proposition in a list of multiple preposition-verb pairs
I would use the commas. I would also add the word less in front of the word passionate: The developers are less experienced in, or less passionate about, UX.
1d
comment What do you call the act of taking science and making it available to the broader public?
In English, we also have the word *vulgarization*, which has as one of its meanings: n. the act of making something attractive to the general public. The word suffers, however, from its connection to the word vulgar, which has a primary meaning of crudely indecent.
Jul
17
comment Better than expected as an adjective?
@ermanen, I think you would need to qualify surprising if the progress was worse than expected (i.e. The progress was surprisingly poor.); but even without a qualifier, progress is a positive word, a forward or onward movement or betterment. I can't think of a time that someone would actually interpret The progress was surprising. as meaning "The progress was worse than I expected." (Note that the past tense is wanted here.)
Jul
17
answered Better than expected as an adjective?
Jul
16
comment Someone who just thinks they know what they're talking about
There's an interesting illustration of this word on this website (scroll down to U): theprojecttwins.com/A-Z-of-Unusual-Words
Jul
15
comment “Recover against” vs. “recover from”
"Recover against" is legal terminology: To obtain a judgement; to succeed in a lawsuit
Jul
10
comment Appropriate word for very fast
This is a common error: loose in your example should be lose. Lose is a verb; loose is an adjective.
Jul
4
comment A word for 'sampler' suitable for international readers
Would just the word *samples* work for your purpose?
Jul
2
comment What do you call a person that adds things to a list?
It should be spelled *contributor.*
Jun
30
comment Is there a reference for the differences between synonyms?
This is one of my favorite posts on ELU: english.stackexchange.com/q/1482/18655 Maybe there is something among the resources listed that you will find useful.
Jun
29
awarded Enlightened
Jun
29
awarded Nice Answer
Jun
27
comment What do you call the sheet that a barber covers you with?
I think the more modern or unisex version of this is a *styling cape* or a *hair cutting cape.*
Jun
25
comment Is there a term for if someone uses their own words on idioms consciously?
I don't believe I would call someone who consciously changes the words in an idiom a malapropist. (I know the OP said "consciously or not" in the question, but the question title says consciously.)
Jun
20
revised Is there an adjective for someone who can withstand ridicule?
added 1 character in body
Jun
20
answered Is there an adjective for someone who can withstand ridicule?
Jun
20
comment Word or phrase for a person who sets their watch forward to prevent being late?
There are the terms *time optimist* and time realist. Maybe your aunt is a realistic time optimist.
Jun
20
comment Should I repeat “the” by enumeration?
I would reword your sentence as follows: He has worked with many Moscow theatres, among them the Moscow Operetta and the Russian Academic Youth, Maly, Yermolova, Oleg Tabakov, Russian Army, Pushkin, and Mossoviet. (Your original sentence is actually a run-on sentence.) See this related post: When should I repeat the definite article? english.stackexchange.com/q/144001/18655
Jun
18
comment Does the negative enhance the sentence?
You might find this useful to read: cambridge.org/other_files/downloads/esl/tge/TGE-Chapter4.pdf Go to the page labeled "62" and the section on Positive and Negative Yes/No Questions. This supports @MattGutting's answer.
Jun
18
comment a word that means something like a "seal of approval."
I think that a doctor might naturally say this: "Your cancer might be because of the virus, but it has not been definitively diagnosed." The phrase definitively diagnose is commonly used to mean to pinpoint the actual cause of a disease often with a test that yields unequivocal results.
1 2 3 4 5