JLG

United States (Flyover Country)

Editor for 30 years, mostly for veterinary/medical publications

Feb
10
comment What do you call those "observation" beds you see in vet clinics?
With all due respect, @ErikKowal, this is not an examination table.
Feb
10
answered What do you call those "observation" beds you see in vet clinics?
Feb
5
awarded Nice Answer
Feb
2
answered What do you call open gaps inbetween teeth, systemic throughout the mouth?
Jan
28
comment Is "layman" an offensive term?
If you're going to use it, I'd change it to layperson. Per this Wordnik entry, layman does have one definition of "a generally ignorant person." For whatever reason, layperson doesn't seem to have that definition.
Jan
28
comment Is "layman" an offensive term?
Related question: english.stackexchange.com/q/77401/18655
Jan
26
answered Shall. I use a preposition here?
Jan
22
awarded differences
Jan
16
awarded Enlightened
Jan
15
answered Need a word for "Unravel in the worst possible way"
Jan
6
comment Is it grammatically acceptable to write, "by March of 2015"?
See these related links for questions about using "by" a date: english.stackexchange.com/q/56335/18655 english.stackexchange.com/q/106167/18655 english.stackexchange.com/q/74450/18655
Dec
29
comment Word which means - "decreases the beauty "
Lackluster is one word. And it is actually more about "lacking brightness, luster, or vitality; dull" wordnik.com/words/lackluster I don't think it necessarily implies that an object was ever beautiful or shiny.
Dec
29
awarded Custodian
Dec
29
reviewed Reject suggested edit on How can I catch more errors when I proofread?
Dec
22
comment How do we know if learning some of the new words are necessary or a waste of energy?
If you want to know the frequency with which an English word is used, you can also check out the fun tool at Wordcount.org. "Wordcount data currently comes from the British National Corpus®, a 100 million word collection of samples of written and spoken language from a wide range of sources, designed to represent an accurate cross-section of current English usage." wordcount.org/main.php
Dec
22
comment How do we know if learning some of the new words are necessary or a waste of energy?
Learning new words is NEVER a waste of time and energy!
Dec
16
comment What's the best, most concise word for the abbreviations put after one's name to denote the achievement of degrees?
I beg to differ. Those are all credentials. See these articles: ansjournalblog.com/2011/06/29/… communications.med.nyu.edu/advertising-branding/… careersdonewrite.com/blog/…
Dec
15
comment What's the best, most concise word for the abbreviations put after one's name to denote the achievement of degrees?
@choster Known as "credentials." :)
Dec
15
answered What's the best, most concise word for the abbreviations put after one's name to denote the achievement of degrees?
Dec
7
revised Difference between "jargon" and "technical terms"
Fixed typos
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