J.R.

United States

"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Never make the mistake of thinking that a tiny preposition has only one meaning.

8h
comment more than can be said
@LansTran - Yes, you have it figured out. In those new examples, "more than can be said for" means what you say. In those instances, there's even more humor intended, I think. It's like saying, "Mr Brown may be bad – but at least he's not wicked, like Mr Green!"
8h
comment How can I ask "What's up" in aristocratic style?
@CoolHandLouis - Thanks for the improvement!
10h
comment How can I ask "What's up" in aristocratic style?
@ColleenV - I've upvoted your comment, and now I'd like to ask a favor: would you weigh in on this meta discussion?
10h
comment How can I ask "What's up" in aristocratic style?
@CoolHand - I keyed in on "aristocratic style" in the title, along with the "I suppose" in the subsequent comment. To me, those hinted that approximizations would be acceptable. Then I again, I could be wrong, too. I'll keep an eye on what the O.P. says, and I'm willing to migrate it if that seems like the best thing to do after we have more information.
10h
comment How can I ask "What's up" in aristocratic style?
@CoolHandLouis - Also note that this answer was left right around the time the O.P.'s comment was left and the question was revised. I'm not sure the exact time frame (i.e., early 19c) was even specified when this answer was composed.
10h
comment How can I ask "What's up" in aristocratic style?
@CoolHand - I think "doesn't belong" is a bit strong. I'd agree that the answers might get more scrutiny over at ELU, and the question might get seen by some users with more expertise in the matter, but we don't know how much the O.P. really needs historical accuracy. If he's writing a screenplay for a major motion picture, then let's migrate it. But if he's simply looking for some "old-fashioned sounding words" to write in a brief personal note or card, then the answer here is fine.
10h
comment How can I ask "What's up" in aristocratic style?
@CoolHandLouis - I had the same thought, but I'm willing to let it stay here if the OP would rather use this community to get an answer.
10h
answered more than can be said
10h
awarded Nice Answer
10h
revised more than can be said
added 3 characters in body
11h
revised How can I ask "What's up" in aristocratic style?
added 55 characters in body
1d
revised Does "somewhere and sometime" make sense, alluding to the future?
fixed two spelling errors; improved title
1d
comment Request Letter for SMS alert facility
This question is off-topic because it's not about the English language, but is essentially asking how to write a business letter. It's too broad, and not within the scope of the site as outlined in the help center.
1d
comment Roads vs The roads, At these times vs In these times
This is true. Though the author chose to leave the article out, there's no harm (or change of meaning) when leaving it in.
1d
comment "The Collins French Gem Grammar" and "Collins French Gem Grammar" -- why use an article?
@Cat - I didn't say any of those were right or wrong, with or without the "the" – I merely said I've seen "inconsistant use." That's partly due to context: including "the" can sound very natural in some places (I've subscribed to The New York Times for more than 11 years, e.g.), but it can sound more natural to leave it out when, for example, the title is being used adjectively (At the banquet, I was seated next to New York Times editor Barbara Strauch). As for when these can (or should) be added or omitted, I was leaving that thorny issue to whoever was willing to leave an answer. :^)
2d
comment "The Collins French Gem Grammar" and "Collins French Gem Grammar" -- why use an article?
I've seen this inconsistant use of the definite article in conjunction with a proper noun from time to time. For example, you may see “(the) Massachusetts Institute of Technology”, “(the) Ohio State University”, “(the) New York Times”, “(the) Kelley Blue Book”, “(The) Elements of Style,” etc., meaning sometimes a "the" will be included, and sometimes it'll be omitted. One example from a news story: ‘selfie’ is Oxford English Dictionary's word of the year .. [‘unselfie’] is not included in the Oxford English Dictionary…"
2d
comment Breaking an axis - is it ever a good idea?
I think your reviewers helped you out in this case. :^)
2d
answered Can the preposition 'in' be omitted here?
2d
comment Correct usage for possessive ’s for the word "Robot"
You have misread the website. It does NOT say, "the door's handle" is unacceptable. The website says: "We don’t usually use the possessive ’s with things" – emphasis added – and "don't usually use" ≠ "is always wrong to use". If the website is correct, I'd expect "the door handle" to be less common than "the door's handle", and indeed that is what we find to be true.
2d
revised Verb has been omitted in sentence
formatting
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