J.R.

United States

"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Never make the mistake of thinking that a tiny preposition has only one meaning.

7h
revised Let's be more careful with closing
I hope you don't mind me changing one word in the title of this question. To my ear, "diligent with closing" sounds like you're trying to say that we need to close MORE questions!
7h
comment How do people whose name is Dick feel about their name?
I think this question has merit, but you won't garner much support for reopening it by making snide remarks to those who are trying to explain their votes. On the Stack Exchange, some people regard a close vote or a downvote cast without explanation as rude. Please take their criticisms constructively, not personally. Now, to address your question, I know several people in the US named Richard who would not want to be called Dick, and I'm pretty sure that the double meaning of the word is a factor. However, people who do use the name are rarely mocked for it; that would be too rude.
7h
answered What does time and attention mean?
19h
comment Why is the meaning of "rustle up" different to "rustle"?
I hope someone will provide a better answer, but I'll give a two-word hint to get you started: *phrasal* *verbs*.
20h
comment Difference between insurrection and uprising
@Mrt - Don't worry – if I took this stuff personally, I wouldn't be running in the moderator election. Still, I wish you'd beef up this question, so that I could happily reopen it.
20h
answered Revision of the "dictionary" close reason
22h
comment Difference between insurrection and uprising
@Mrt - I don't presume you haven't looked in a dictionary, I've simply implored you to share what you found when you looked. Why the stubborn refusal to do so? As for my lack of sympathy, I've answered over 1000 quesitons on ELL. As a moderator, I've reopened questions I thought were unfairly closed, and I've been criticized for that. I've also asked the community to be more careful before voting to close. (Btw, #65615 has 3 close votes, too, but let's focus on improving this question.)
22h
comment Difference between insurrection and uprising
@Mrt - And I mean in my "rant" that, the way you've asked this question, that's a very justifiable opinion.
22h
comment How is 'prowl' different from 'move around'?
I recommend looking the word up in two or three dictionaries (OneLook is a great place to start), but you would only need to post definitiions from one dictionary in your question. Pick the one that was most helpful to you – that will probably be the most helpful to us, too!
22h
comment Difference between insurrection and uprising
As to your rant in ALL CAPS, where did you find the words "primarily opinion-based"? Read more carefully: your question was closed because it is "entirely answerable with a dictionary" – which it is. If you had taken the time to copy a few definitions from the dictionary and explain why you were still confused about the difference between these two synonyms, then it would no longer be answerable with a dictionary – we'd be answering your question instead of debating the merits of closing it. @DogLover - this question should not be reopened without an edit.
22h
comment Difference between insurrection and uprising
If I had a dime for every time I've linked to my "Details, please" post on meta, I'd be rich. You've asked questions for almost a year now; you should know: the community appreciates research. The Stack Exchange is not be the first place to go when a question pops in your head, and questions shouldn't be written that way. Why is it so hard to look up the words, paste a few definitions, and then explain why you're still confused? That's just courtesy. If I were to answer this, my first step would be to look up those two words. Spare me the effort and watch the upvotes roll in.
22h
answered Word for "hating a person whom you don't even know"
23h
comment Word for "hating a person whom you don't even know"
@JMB - (Your comment should probably be an answer.) We can also say, "I hate people who cheat on exams" when we want to talk about the general case, rather than one specific instance.
23h
comment How is 'prowl' different from 'move around'?
@Akihiro, yes the best way to handle this now is to go to a dictionary, and look up prowl. Then, if that hasn't answered your question, do two things: (1) Paste that definition into this question, so that everyone knows you have researched this, and (2) explain why that definition doesn't answer your question (in other words, say why you are still confused, or why you need more clarification than the dictionary provides). Do those two things, and this will become a model question instead of an on-hold question. If you ask your future questions in that same way, you'll earn more rep faster.
23h
comment How is 'prowl' different from 'move around'?
@Stephie - Great comment; there's still time to run for moderator :-) As for good examples of word-difference questions, I'd also point Akihiro and others to this question, which was also in danger of being put on hold, until the OP added some clarifying remarks, which were graciously edited into the question by TJY.
23h
comment How is 'prowl' different from 'move around'?
@Akihiro - Your question has not been "banned," it has been put "on hold." That means it can be reopened if you make it more fitting for the site. As for those "tons of questions" you found, how many of them had more than one or two upvotes? Low-quality quesitons are often a problem on this site. Instead of comparing your question to several mediocre questions, it would be better to learn how to write a good one. Did you read THIS yet? Pay particular attention to Matt's answer there, too.
1d
comment How is 'prowl' different from 'move around'?
I'm sorry, but just about every dictionary I checked explained this pretty clearly. If you already looked this word up in a dictionary, and are still confused for some reason, then, **please**, paste the definition here, and explain in more detail why you are still confused.
1d
answered "called" vs. "named" vs. "namely"
1d
comment "called" vs. "named" vs. "namely"
Rather than trying to do this in a single word, you should consider using a phrase: We use textual delimiters and identifiable constants or patterns within the content, which we will call anchors.
1d
comment What does out of the box mean?
@Milad - out here means you can take it out of the box and use it.
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