J.R.

United States

"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Never make the mistake of thinking that a tiny preposition has only one meaning.

3h
comment Cheating in college
This question needs more background information. I might give different answers depending on whether this "cheater with a sudden conscience" was going to graduate next spring, or had graduated 10 years ago.
3h
comment Writing a recommendation letter as an employer for a student applying to programs in a different field
After talking with several hiring managers, I get the impression that many of them are more interested in factors such as work ethic and initiative then they are about background knowledge in the field. Not to oversimplify the problem, but domain expertise can be learned on the job more easily than a good attitude. When I've had a chance to hire and was asked about qualifications, I've sometimes answered by saying I have only two: must be (a) willing to work hard, and (b) be committed to excellence. Give me those two things and I'll be fine; leave them out and I'll be sorry I hired the person.
4h
awarded Nice Question
1d
comment Does $1.0000000000\cdots 1$ with an infinite number of $0$ in it exist?
RE: "I think there is only one infinity, we can think it as the biggest number..." You might want to get a better grasp on what infinity means; there is no "biggest number." Incidentally, a better way to phrase your title would be to refer to the string of 0's as infinitely many zeroes, not an infinite number of zeroes.
1d
comment Triple Commas not acceptable?
Your question title mentions "triple commas", but there are only two commas in the examples you are asking about. Perhaps you meant double commas? In any case, as others have said, it's not the number of commas at issue – it's the structure of the sentence.
1d
revised Is it this grammar correct?
added 24 characters in body
1d
revised How can I help my essay's readers "get into [my] mind a little more?"
put quoted paragraph in a quote box
1d
comment DO NOT FEED THE BEARS
@Fumble - Thanks for mentioning that; perhaps I should elaborate. Signs exhorting people to not feed animals are meant to discourage food handouts, not because the sign posters want the animals to go hungry, but because they don't want the animals learning an unhealthy dependence. In this case, I meant to say, "Don't answer questions like this one," and here's why: once one "kind person" provides that helpful answer, it encourages OPs to keep asking bad questions, even when 4 or 5 others are trying to help them learn a more fitting way to ask.
1d
comment How can power undergo 'exegesis'?
Next time, try multiple dictionaries. Much of your confusion here is because that one definition you cite is condensed and simplified, and doesn't cover every possible way the word can be used. The page I linked to includes this meaning: A discourse intended to explain or illustrate a subject.
1d
comment DO NOT FEED THE BEARS
@Fumble - We're talking about a new user who deserves a nudge in the right direction. I couldn't say all of this in a comment, but I could write a post here, and point to it. Maybe this is a "one-off" OP, but then again, maybe this person can eventually become a valued contributor with the right advice. It's not like the help pages are the easiest thing in the world to find.
2d
comment Are these sentences grammatically correct?
Did you write this? Did you find these sentences in an article or book? Are they from an English exercise with implanted errors? What is your "problem" with these two sentences? You might want to read my latest meta post.
2d
comment Error Identification
the correct way to ask a question on ELL is to ask one question, and be sure to include where the source of your confusion lies. Don't skimp on details; make it obvious you've put forth a good faith effort into solving the problem yourself but have now reached a dead end. Also, if your question is about a practice test problem, don't be afraid to reframe the question so that it is more about English in general and less about this particular problem from a book. I've provided more guidance here.
2d
comment Error Identification
@Mary - Ask your questions in questions, not in comments.
2d
asked DO NOT FEED THE BEARS
2d
comment What should I do if I've enrolled in a badly organized course?
RE: Features present in the first couple of assignments that weren't marked as a problem suddenly became a problem in the third assignment. This shouldn't surprise you. Early in a course, a professor might be more lenient, figuring, "Students shouldn't be expected to know this right now." Later, grading might become more strict, with the reasoning, "By now, students should know better than to keep making this mistake." You'd have to get much more specific before convincing me the problem is solely his and not partly yours.
2d
comment scan immediate left, next right, farthest right -- are these adverbs?
You don't cite the source of your quote (unfortunately). That makes me wonder if these expressions might be jargon in the web layout profession.
2d
comment What to do about top students making other students lose confidence?
@Nicolas - Whether they are blurting out answers out-of-turn, or raising their hands skyward almost immediately after the questions are asked, the effect can be the same: dampening the motivation for other students to learn. Some will behave as though, "I can stop thinking now; this fellow next to me already knows the answer." In group work, this so-called leader often takes on too much responsibility to the detriment of his peers (they don't learn as much). That said, we agree that this situation can manifest itself in many ways, and different circumstances may call for different solutions.
2d
comment What to do about top students making other students lose confidence?
@Nicholas - Just because one particular student understands the topic better and is more vocal about it during class doesn't mean that student is "excelling;" it depends on the nature of the in-class discussion. Suppose I'm trying to give everyone "equal time," and my questions are designed to help people think a problem through (think Socratic method here), but one savant keeps blurting out an answer before other students have time to work through the problem mentally. That's not excelling, that's distracting. My classroom is not a quiz bowl, and knowing when to speak IS a "life skill."
2d
comment Which one of the following sentences is correct?
I agree, although the O.P.'s #2 might be used to mean your #1. It wouldn't be "proper" English, but I could see someone saying in on the phone or something (unlike the O.P.'s #1).
Oct
17
awarded Popular Question
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