J.R.

United States

"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Never make the mistake of thinking that a tiny preposition has only one meaning.

12h
awarded Nice Answer
20h
revised What are does "artistic and social interests" mean in this context?
added 349 characters in body
23h
revised What are does "artistic and social interests" mean in this context?
added 47 characters in body; edited title
23h
comment What are does "artistic and social interests" mean in this context?
Ben, where did this question and answer come from? Had you included that in your original question, people would have been able to readily see what your question was really about.
1d
revised Having, holding, giving, and throwing parties
moved question into question and shortened title
1d
answered Having, holding, giving, and throwing parties
1d
revised Having, holding, giving, and throwing parties
added 13 characters in body
1d
comment What does "degut" mean?
The answer can be found in the dictionary. I'll add that it's not a very commonly-used word. I didn't even recognize it as an English word until I clicked on the dictionary links. I looked up "degut the" on Google, and only found 1,100 or so hits (compare that with "gut the", which returns almost half a million). I suppose degut isn't all that commonly used because gut can be used as its synonym.
1d
comment "Is it left-handed?" Or "Is it for left-handed?"
This answer nails it. "I bought you some new golf clubs." "Thanks, but are they left-handed?" Sure, you can add the word clubs after left-handed, but it's quite unnecessary in informal conversation. Another informal way you could refer to the person instead of the clubs would be, "Thanks, but are they for lefties?"
1d
comment "We're pregnant!"
@Janus - Yes, there are contexts where I might use the plural pronoun. Say the next day we were supposed to go rake leaves in a park, but she partied too hard last night. When I get the phone call asking, "Are you two still meeting us at noon?" I might answer, "No, we have a hangover." Sure, only my wife's head is pounding, not mine, but a hangover is still the reason we can't go. Also, that doesn't cast her in quite as bad a light as if I said, "No, she has a hangover," which might come across as, "She is irresponsible, but not me." It might depend on if I'm feeling annoyed or understanding.
1d
awarded difference
1d
revised Politely phrase "how do you do"
always "I", never "i" - thank you
1d
comment "We're pregnant!"
@HighPerformanceMark - Would you be just as nauseated if the couple exclaimed, "We're going to have a baby!" That's essentially what the couple is saying. As for "taking the full share of effort that pregnancy demands," there's no comparison regarding who's life will affected more for the next nine months. However, about a year later, a lot of dads are indeed playing a pretty big role in parenting. The lifestyle changes don't end at childbirth, which is why some couples might find the expression more acceptable than you.
1d
revised What great writers have used coordinating conjunctions at the start of sentences?
added 9 characters in body
2d
answered What great writers have used coordinating conjunctions at the start of sentences?
2d
answered What is the difference between “remote” and “distant”?
2d
comment In what situations are both "I" and "me" valid?
Let us go then, you and me, while the evening is spread out against a tree... A little more here.
2d
comment Difference between "wreck" and "wreckage"
I agree with @Esoteric - if the title says it all, then you should do more research. Asking "What's the difference between these two words?" is acceptable, but such questions should follow the basic format of this classic question.
2d
comment What does "prominent chin" mean?
This comment was closed by five people who cited the "entirely answerable with a dictionary" reason. I looked up prominent in the dictionary, and found the dictionary is unable to hone the definition down much more than the O.P. has in this question (see Macmillan, e.g.; a "prominent chin" could be one that sticks out, or one that is easy to see and notice). Based on the three possibilities cited by the O.P., I'm assuming the O.P. already has consulted a dictionary.
2d
comment Question about meaning of "jump" and "jump-start"
@Fumble - I agree; it appears to be regional. I've heard it called "popping the clutch" all my life, but had never heard of "bump starting" until I read your answer. You should add "bump starting" to the Wikipedia page :^) As to your last comment, I don't see a need for a standard term – after all, we already have standard transmissions ;^)
1 2 3 4 5