J.R.

United States

"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.

2h
comment Do we need to welcome "thesaurus" questions?
Asking for what is common or colloquial is NOT a "thesaurus question." A thesaurus question asks, "What's another word for X?" A stipulation like, "What's a more common word for X?", or, "What's a more polite word for X?", or, "What's a more colloquial word for X?", or, "What's a more technical word for X?" is different, because thesauri in general do not say much about how their listed synonyms are used, while native speakers can refute or confirm a word's pervasiveness, politeness, or familiarity. As for proofreading, ELL is not a free proofreading service.
4h
revised Responding to "Nice to meet you"
edited tags
4h
comment Video equipment, audio equipment, lighting and software for online teaching?
You might be better off asking the institution(s) where you plan to offer your services. Some schools may have standards they would expect you to adhere to. Also, you need to get a better idea of what you want the end product to look like. Document cameras, web cameras, and capturing software are all useful tools, but I'd hesitate to make any specific recommendations until I knew more about your subject matter, your plan of attack, and your teaching style.
6h
revised Is "She is under the shower" a proper English sentence?
This edit should be more "transparent" if we are going to delete the comments which prompted it.
6h
comment How can I find out what I did wrong?
@DanB - That's a good litmus test for ELU. For ELL, a more appropriate litmus test might be: Would a general native speaker, a man on the street, know the answer to the question, while non-native speakers would have trouble figuring out this answer on their own? That said, proofreading questions are considered off-topic, even though they would pass that litmus test. We don't want ELL to become a free proofreading service, inundated with request for touching up resumes, cover letters, homework assignments, advertisements, and the like.
6h
comment Do we need to welcome "thesaurus" questions?
I agree that adding something like, "I found this and that expression – which is more common and natural?" could maybe improve some of these questions. That said, I still think allowances can be made, particularly for newer users. I don't see the need to discourage or condemn all of what you call "thesaurus questions" in a meta post. We need to look deeper at each question individually, and not paint with too broad a brush.
7h
revised Do we need to welcome "thesaurus" questions?
deleted 1 character in body
8h
answered Do we need to welcome "thesaurus" questions?
1d
comment What state does "being overwhelmed" actually imply?
It could be used to express either one, but I think it's most often associated with mental stress.
1d
comment Meaning of "a dollar or more"
It's not just the repeated word; the way #2 is written might be confusing to a reader. Outside of the context of explaining #1, it's not a very good way to describe the price of something.
1d
revised Meaning of "a dollar or more"
deleted 6 characters in body
1d
revised Verbs for describing the action of defecating
edited title
1d
comment An objection-objective relationship
@Jim - I think what's being asked is this: Why do two words with the same root appear to be so unrelated in meaning?
1d
comment I wanted to be a doctor. I had wanted to be a doctor
If you've read other books, you should tell us a little bit about what you have learned already, and what you want more clarification about. Too many people come to ELL having done some research, gotten confused, but when they ask a question, they don't mention anything they've researched already. To prevent this, I recommend reading some of the pointers here.
1d
awarded Necromancer
1d
revised What differences are between "What's that?" and "What is it?"
quote boxes, spacing around quote marks
1d
answered Difference between "mortals" and "the mortals" in a text where "the" doesn't seem to be referring to specific ones
2d
comment Which one is correct: Id or ID?
@Fumble - I think we all agree with that, but I think Jasper's comment is trying to figure out where the OP might have seen Id to mean "identifier." It seems like a plausible guess.
2d
comment "Fiction is to grown men *what* play is to the child"
Maybe I'm just seeing things, but I think there might be a bit more to the original wording than you're describing. I see the sentence as saying, "Children engage in playing; grown men partake in the [somewhat more refined and mature term] fiction." That is: Children like to get lost in fantasy worlds in their imagination when they play, grown-ups get lost in fantasy worlds when they read. I guess that's about the same as what you're saying, too, but I wanted to take another stab at it. It's a form of rhetorical parallelism.
2d
comment Which one is correct: Id or ID?
ID can be a shortened form of other words/phrases besides identifier. For example, "ID" can be a shortened form of identification card (e.g., "May I see an ID, please?"), or even the verb identify (as in, "The victim was able to ID the robbery suspect").
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