Vic

Ireland

Age: 71

I was born at an early age and subsequently became an old grouch.

Suffered a nostalgia attack recently and ended up with a netbook booting FreeDos, loaded with antique programming language versions (Quick Basic, Turbo C, Turbo Pascal, dBase, Clipper '87... the list goes on...) It was quite a revelation how much I remembered and how much I had forgotten. Also a revelation how fast a low spec computer could be when not slowed by a pretty GUI! (That's VERY fast...)

Once the red mist had dissipated, I came to the mature realisation that the world had moved on while I was not looking so I decided to master the rudiments of Ruby and then possibly to take a sideways look at Rails.

Thus far it has been a pleasant surprise how much support exists on Youtube, the easy availability of online documentation is great and all is going well. At least it would be if I could just install a Ruby plugin into Eclipse Indigo version under Ubuntu 11.10...

So that's it, all that's fit to print so thanks for reading and have a good day.

Vic

Sep
25
awarded Autobiographer
Sep
24
awarded Autobiographer
Sep
24
awarded Autobiographer
Mar
3
comment Recovering from 'grub rescue>' crash
When I had a grub2 problem on a machine without cd drive I was able to recover by using my Gparted Live usb memory stick drive. I booted into Gparted live. THEN I started a terminal and typed fdisk -l (that's letter ell, not number 1) The output from that let me identify the partition which had the root partition and from there I followed the excellent instructions above and I was soon happily dual booting again.
Feb
17
awarded Yearling
Feb
17
awarded Yearling
Mar
15
answered How To Set Up Orca Screen Reader?
Mar
2
answered removing unnecessary libs
Feb
29
answered Ubuntu wrongly warns "Not enough space" which I do have
Feb
27
comment Resize root partition from home partition space (swap in the middle)
That's right, no fstab editing.
Feb
25
comment Should I run Ubuntu alongside Windows or in a virtual machine?
Just to add a little more about accessing ntfs partitions from ubuntu, you need to have ntfs-3g and ntfs-config installed from the repos. ntfs-config is an easy to use gui which makes configuring ntfs-3g an absolute snap. Once done, you'll have access to internal and external partitions, which I find really useful. You are quite right, win can not easily see linux partitions: this serves to underline the superiority of open systems!
Feb
25
comment Best disk partition for normal users
I reiterate that some have no option but to use windows for the reasons stated in my post. The setup I describe has worked well for several years on a small network of 9 computers with no problems and with invaluable operational advantages. I'm disappointed to have been voted down because I mentioned an os other than Ubuntu.
Feb
25
awarded Editor
Feb
25
revised Best disk partition for normal users
improved formatting
Feb
25
answered Best disk partition for normal users
Feb
24
answered Why am I not given a GUI after installing ubuntu-desktop in Ubuntu Server?
Feb
24
answered Is my boot process normal? It takes 50 seconds boot
Feb
21
comment GRUB fatal installation of Ubuntu 11.10 - Dual boot for Win7
Try not creating /boot. Left to its own devices the installer will stick everything in /root. After a crash, you can't recover your data. IMHO much better to have just /root, /swap and /home. Then if disaster strikes and your OS flies south you have the option of reinstalling and keeping the original /home, so your data is still there. Which is nice. If you don't specify a /boot partition the installer creates a 'virtual' /boot inside /root, which works absolutely fine, one thing less to worry about. Ext 4 is fine for everything, barring /swap, of course.
Feb
21
comment GRUB fatal installation of Ubuntu 11.10 - Dual boot for Win7
I reserve Ext2 for solid state drives to reduce the number of journal writes, because the early ones can 'wear out' quickly. With conventional HDDs I use Ext4 because of the added protection that conveys. As an experiment, you could use gparted to remove all the partitions you created and run a vanilla install to see if the installer can create a viable ubuntu installation pretty much left to its own devices as in install using available space. Alternatively, just create a 10Gb /root, 1Gb swap and assign the rest to /home and let the installer take the strain. It rarely goes wrong.
Feb
21
answered GRUB fatal installation of Ubuntu 11.10 - Dual boot for Win7
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