Probability, finance and due diligence - @EllieAsksWhy

2d
comment Who is the older of two, Goldberry or Tom Bombadil
@Einer Yes. Perhaps I lack subtlety of understanding, but "Tom is Eldest" means one thing to me, unequivocally... and that is why Jimmy's answer is right. IMHO ;o) of course.
Apr
3
comment Why is "Select * from table" considered bad practice
And good reasons here, Why is select * considered harmful?
Mar
29
comment What is [tag:senses]?
So if even you say "no", ermanen (I agree with you), can we make the [tag:senses] tag a synonym for the [tag:meanings] tag, thus eliminating likely confusion e.g. as in this question with the senses tag english.stackexchange.com/questions/104483/… The question is about common sense.
Mar
29
comment Fitting probability distribution to data
@EngrStudent My first source check for all things statistical is usually North Carolina State (or SAS or Duke University ;o) This quantile regression modeling page might be helpful.
Mar
26
revised Why should I care if a site uses encryption or not if I'm not exchanging any sensitive data?
I removed gratuitously disparaging content that doesn't add to the answer's inherent value, AND is likely to cause debate e.g. comparison with the veracity of other nations' news media, say BBC ;o)
Mar
21
revised the USA vs the US
added 5 characters in body
Mar
21
comment the USA vs the US
@DougM Yes, but I didn't convey it too well! I just edited my answer, and tried to make it clear. Thank you so much for noticing!
Mar
21
revised the USA vs the US
More clarity per DougM's good comment!
Mar
21
answered the USA vs the US
Mar
21
reviewed Reviewed "Do You Dreams Come True": A clever pun or just bad English?
Mar
21
revised "Do You Dreams Come True": A clever pun or just bad English?
Added missing spaces; fixed typo's etc.
Mar
21
reviewed Reviewed How do we differentiate long vowels from short vowels in English
Mar
21
comment How do we differentiate long vowels from short vowels in English
Could you clarify, i.e. more directly explain how this answers the question?
Mar
21
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Term to describe quality of one's day
Mar
12
revised Word for a person who loses or has lost faith?
Added comment by OP http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/156501/word-for-a-person-who-loses-or-has-lost-faith/156505?noredirect=1#comment326379_156501
Mar
12
comment Word for a person who loses or has lost faith?
Crestfallen is used to describe a fleeting emotion. It might be no more than a few second's duration. To lose faith in a person, process or belief system (whether in the context of religion or not) is different. It might not be permanent, but losing faith is not used to describe casual matters.
Mar
10
revised Word for a person who loses or has lost faith?
slight grammar, more consistent formatting; corrected spelling of disillusioned to match cited defn; still has too much punctuation...? Maybe not...fussy OCD me ;o)
Feb
23
awarded Talkative
Feb
21
awarded Nice Answer
Feb
19
awarded Caucus
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