Occupation: Scientist (Psychologist, with an affinity to technology), working in mobile media, critical thinking, and reflection

Interests: Writing, creating books, photography, work methods

Dec
16
comment Didn't pay attention to rules and created an illegal note card for exam?
"how would I explain it to the school if it's necessary" Like you did here? It's trite, but one quality is how people manage to deal with mistakes. You made a mistake, admitted it, dealt with it, and learned from it. And despite the reduction you still managed to pass.
Dec
16
comment Is it inappropriate to explain why I really want to live where the university is located in my job talk?
One adviser mentioned that this factor depends on the ranking of the university. If it's a widely known highly reputable university, saying you have relatives nearby might come off ... strange. That reason would be tiny compared to the prestige of working for that university. If however it's a small one it might carry more weight. This said, I'd probably mention it once and in passing, either at beginning ("Find place?" "Yeah, know city, family lives nearby.") or end ("Traveling back soon?" "No, stay with family in town for a few days.").
Dec
16
answered How can I politely explain to my students that the texts in my course are all in English and it is their duty to read it nonetheless?
Dec
15
comment Terrible grade in undergraduate research project, how will this affect graduate admissions?
I'd be careful with the explanation "My supervisor did not show up regularly plus he was 2 hours far away from my place." Yes, it's unfair and understandable, but it also sounds like blaming others. As trite as it sounds, I'd focus on the lessons learned here. Also: Is there a way in which you can show that you acquired the necessary skills later? Personally, I got the worst passing grade in stats (undergraduate psychology -- due to a week of caffeine, which keeps you awake but turns your brain into concrete) and used my diploma thesis to show my competency in this area.
Dec
15
comment Why do some Universities give honorary degrees?
Might be helpful to differentiate even between honorary degrees. E.g., are these degrees given to a dictator by a university within the country vs. by universities which are "independent" and widely acknowledged for their scientific work. BTW, I think Mugabe has lost a couple for human rights violations.
Dec
15
comment Effective open-ended student evaluation questions
It might be helpful to give the students some hints regarding the issues they can address. For example, I used free text to assess presentations, but gave students a list of criteria (e.g., slide design, articulation, etc.). Students picked what they found noteworthy (positive and negative). In any case, if you suspect some strengths/weaknesses in your style, you might want to narrow down the questions to these specific issues.
Dec
15
comment A friend's professor is asking her to babysit for free. Is this normal?
Not only very unethical but also very unprofessional -- unless there are other circumstances that explain it. Given that the OPs description was vague, the easiest thing would probably have been to ask the friend, not the forum, what those circumstances are. The friend might get something in return, for example.
Dec
15
comment How to handle possibly subtly flirtatious emails from students?
There's also the issue that different TA's might have different standards. She might have made the experience that this is the way to communicate with a TA (or that open feedback/flattery works/is expected). Personally I did communicate rather informally in my first courses and changed it to more formal communication later on. In any case, don't sweat it, continue to be professional and lead by example.
Dec
15
comment Can my degree be revoked if my relationship with my advisor sours post-defense?
I agree with both points here. Academia is small and people talk (see other comment) -- one (but certainly not the main) reason why integrity is so important. So it depends on what the OP wants to do in the future and the kind of person the adviser is. Personally, I would ignore the "sourness" and just focus on the (non-interpersonal) reasons why the collaboration did not work out (e.g., time, other interests). Stating that it's not the person might be a way to avoid a continued grudge.
Dec
15
awarded Supporter
Dec
15
comment Can my degree be revoked if my relationship with my advisor sours post-defense?
Some advisers might be willing to go this far (not only accepting a shot in the foot, but taking off the whole leg). But that would take much more than just a "sour" relationship. It requires the kind of conflict where a person does not care anymore about own losses or future well-being (way past mediation). Can happen but is highly unlikely. If the adviser really holds a grudge he might try to damage your future career in other ways. Academic disciplines are usually small and people talk. If you ever continue to work with the topic a good professional relationship can be helpful.
Dec
15
awarded Autobiographer
Apr
18
awarded Nice Answer
Feb
10
awarded Yearling
Feb
10
awarded Yearling
Feb
10
awarded Yearling
May
30
awarded Editor
May
30
revised Participant identifier for a field study in a sensitive work environment
added clarification of the conditions
May
30
answered How can I deal with an overload of writing projects?
May
25
awarded Student
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